Some vampires suck energy not blood

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"Some vampires suck energy not blood"

Speaking of vampires in need of slaying, the AP reports:

A force as insidious as Dracula is quietly sucking a nickel of every dollar’s worth of the electricity that seeps from your home’s outlets.

Insert the little fangs of your cell phone charger in the outlet and leave it there, phone attached: That’s vampire electronics.

Allow your computer to hide in the cloak of darkness known as “standby mode” rather than shutting it off: That’s vampire electronics.

The latest estimates show 5 percent of electricity used in the United States goes to standby power, a phenomenon energy efficiency experts find all the more terrifying as energy prices rise and the planet warms. That amounts to about $4 billion a year.

The percentage could rise to 20 percent by 2010, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Everything you could possibly want to know about standby power is here.

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3 Responses to Some vampires suck energy not blood

  1. John Mashey says:

    Yes, good topic. I’ve found a “Watts Up?” or similar device to be very useful. Plug your appliance into it, and either see the instantaneous wattage, or leave it on for a day and get the accumulated watt-hours, i.e., good for things like fridges. Among other things, it made us put all our office gear on swtiched power strips, so it is easy to just turn the whole bunch off.

  2. Shannon says:

    People love to talk about energy vampires, wall warts, etc. If you look at the typical energy consumption in the home there are a lot of other important things to consider first (and the 4% estimate seems really high). Things like insulating and crack sealing, replacing your lightbulbs with those twisty CFLs, reducing your car trips, drying clothes on a rack or on a line, and replacing your old thermostat with a programmable one. These can save you more like 30% of your energy costs and your direct carbon emissions from energy use.

  3. msn nickleri says:

    Yes, good topic. I’ve found a “Watts Up?” or similar device to be very useful. Plug your appliance into it, and either see the instantaneous wattage, or leave it on for a day and get the accumulated watt-hours, i.e., good for things like fridges. Among other things, it made us put all our office gear on swtiched power strips, so it is easy to just turn the whole bunch off.