Tumblr Icon RSS Icon

Slick Sarah, the make-believe maverick

Posted on

"Slick Sarah, the make-believe maverick"

Share:

google plus icon

[JR: The "Bridge to Nowhere" is at its heart an energy story, since it is a transportation infrastructure story, and the country will have to spend hundreds of billions of dollars redesigning its infrastructure by midcentury to deal with peak oil and global warming.]

sarahpalin44.jpgVP choice Sarah Palin keeps repeating her lie that she said “thanks but no thanks” to the “Bridge to Nowhere” — even in the face of unusually strong and widespread media debunking and strong visual evidence to the contrary. When Fox News’ Chris Wallace debunks your multiple lies, it’s probably time, at the very least, to work up some new lies.

Either Slick Sarah cynically believes that you can fool all the people all the time, much as Bush and McCain do, or Prevaricatin’ Palin has actually come to believe her own lies, much as Bush and McCain do.

And, of course, Slick Sarah is an old-style lobbyist-hiring pol, who may well be the queen of pork (see “Note to media: Pork queen Palin is an earmark expert, NOT energy expert“). Slick Sarah and her lobbyists lined Alaskan pockets with U.S. taxpayer money to the tune of $4000 per citizen of Wasilla. But McCain “can’t wait to introduce her to Washington.” If she replicates that “success” on a national level as VP, that would be more than $1 trillion in earmarks.

Slick Sarah is all hat and no moose. She’s the make-believe Maverick.

Her obsessive phoniness in the face of the facts, I think, suggests a defining nickname to describe what appears to be a fundamental character flaw. Memorable nicknames usually use one of the memorable rhetorical figures of speech — alliteration, assonance, consonance, rhyming, metaphor, or pun. [Yes, that is a bit redundant: Almost all of the figures of speech were developed 25 centuries ago specifically to aid the memory of both the speaker and the listener.] For instance, “Sarah Barracuda” is metaphor and assonance/consonance combined. Very memorable.

The rest of this post can be found here.

« »

8 Responses to Slick Sarah, the make-believe maverick

  1. Charlie says:

    Excellent points.

    “Sarah Slick the Make-Believe Maverick” rhymes and rolls of the tongue better.

  2. Cliff Figallo says:

    Plainly, Palin is a ridiculous choice on every count, but here’s the problem – the people who are excited about here DON’T CARE. They don’t think like you and me. Instead, she some how “completes” them. “She has backbone.”

    Watch the Frank Luntz-led focus group and notice why some people react so positively. Notice how Luntz is looking hard to understand why people thought it was a bad choice.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnV1pS7qVD8

  3. Dano says:

    Like the vid clip that had the talking heads speaking (what they thought was) off-mic, it’s a very cynical choice. They are outright lying in their campaign and playing the media very well.

    But look at the overall campaign the Repubs are running. My dad ran political campaigns for many years, so I’ve been around dozens of them. And I have to say that the Repubs have the advantage and – despite the fact that the last 8 years have been a disaster – unless the Dems change their tune right quick they are going to go down again. I said this in 2000 and 2004, it is the Dems to win, and they aren’t winning it. At this point.

    Again, it looks like they don’t know how to finish.

    Best,

    D

  4. Rick C says:

    Clearly McCain and the Repugs have appealed to the reptilian center of the brain. Please no flames.

    You undermined your argument on Obama’s alleged lack of experience when McCain selected a governor with less than two years of experience. She’s just a heartbeat away from the office that would be held by the oldest man elected to the presidency and who has had 4 bouts with melanoma. At least Bush was in the Texas Governor’s Mansion for six years. That’s not saying much though given the Texas Governor had serverly limited power when Bush was Governor.

  5. Dano says:

    Rick C, I’m with ya but the Repubs have the momentum and are controlling the dialogue.

    I was away all day yesterday and this morning I see the lead story was “the controversy” over the lipstick on a pig thing. Fer chrissake, are you kidding me? That led? Unbelievable.

    Unless the Dems get some message makeover, there’s no way the experience thing is going to get play. No way. They aren’t even in the same league when it comes to crafting message that works. Their TV ads are rife with their pat phrases that elicit emotion. Dems? Eh.

    And I rarely vote Repub, save for one or two local guys that were better than the knob Dem that was running. But the Rs are controlling the game.

    Best,

    D

  6. Hank says:

    Joe,

    Thanks for the excellent reminder from your book, ” Hell & High Water” of the power of language.

    This memory may not inject much enlightenment into the discussion, but I have been reminded of the 96 Clinton approach. For one part of their message control they continued with a repeating mantra, ” Education, Environment, etc…..(there were four and I cant remember the last two.)

    Of course, at the time, Bob Dole was already framed by the Clintons as basically the “old guy” and Karl Rove hadn’t yet fully emerged with his bag of tricks.

    I wonder, has the combination of the all out cultural war approach emphasizing race & gay marriage baiting together with electoral caging al la Ohio become something even Bill Clinton himself would find too much to handle?

  7. shop says:

    Her obsessive phoniness in the face of the facts, I think, suggests a defining nickname to describe what appears to be a fundamental character flaw. Memorable nicknames usually use one of the memorable rhetorical figures of speech — alliteration, assonance, consonance, rhyming, metaphor, or pun. [Yes, that is a bit redundant: Almost all of the figures of speech were developed 25 centuries ago specifically to aid the memory of both the speaker and the listener.] For instance, “Sarah Barracuda” is metaphor and assonance/consonance combined. Very memorable.