The best climate blog you aren’t reading

Posted on

"The best climate blog you aren’t reading"

I know the climate junkies out there are reading RealClimate and DeSmogBlog and all The New Top 10 Climate Blogs.

But I’d like to direct you to Greenfyre’s, which Alexa suggests folks aren’t reading (yet). I was first taken by the blog of biologist Mike Kaulbars when I saw the post “Global Warming is over! once every decade or so …” which had this great figure:

Global Warming ends every decade or so ...

It’s always cooling, except, of course, when it’s not.

If you have your own hidden gem of a climate blog — an internet geode, as it were — I’d love to hear about it.

« »

30 Responses to The best climate blog you aren’t reading

  1. DavidONE says:

    Mike is a one-man activist army. His shut-down of the Deniers at Digg is relentless. And he’s an entertaining, perceptive writer. Definitely worthy of anyone’s attention.

  2. @David…

    I agree… I find his wit engaging and his strong writing skills will keep me coming back.

    Thanks, Joe, for another great resource.

  3. Although one story I read had more than 100 comments… clearly some one is reading!

  4. Baerbel W. says:

    Thanks, Joe, for the link to Greenfyre! I just I wish I had more time to actually read everything!

  5. Russ says:

    That reminded me of one of Zeno’s paradoxes – an arrow is motionless at any instant, therefore it can’t be moving in general, and there’s no such thing as motion at all!

  6. Logan Jones says:

    It’s not just a climate blog, but an all around green blog: The Thin Green Line, through the SF Chronicle.

    sfgate.com/blogs/thingreenline

  7. Deech56 says:

    Open Mind by Tamino is highly recommended – for the rest of us who are not mathematicians, Tamino makes the maths easier to understand.

  8. thingsbreak says:

    Also Michael Tobis at Only In It For The Gold. I didn’t mention him first as I assume you already know of him. If not, you guys could probably have some interesting discussions about the state of economic thought that passes for “mainstream” (i.e. neoclassical limitless growth models).

  9. Brewster says:

    It reminds me of something my father used to say:

    “Quitting smoking is easy – I’ve done it dozens of times!”

  10. Linda S says:

    As for other gems, I really like Johnny Rook at Climaticide:
    http://climaticidechronicles.org/category/climaticide/

  11. Johnny Rook says:

    I have been reading Greenfyre’s for a while now and agree completely that it’s one of the best climate blogs on the web. Not only is the science solid, but the writing is far better than on most blogs.

    Blogging for the future at Climaticide Chronicles

  12. Linda S says:

    Oh, and then there is Throbgoblins — not exactly a blog and not specifically climate oriented, but a nice bit of comic sarcasm all the same:
    http://throbgoblins.blogspot.com/

  13. Bob Wright says:

    Commondreams is a progressive blog based on news and opinions from around the world, and it usually has at least one new climate article at any time.

    It also has a regular cast of skeptics, and the debate gets pretty heated at times.

    http://www.commondreams.org/

    Example: http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2009/01/28-8

  14. Gareth says:

    Shameless self promotion, because if I don’t do it (etc)…

  15. Lou Grinzo says:

    Gareth: Be careful–that shameless self-promotion thing can really spread once someone starts it.

    Oops.

  16. Gareth says:

    Does it spread like margarine, or butter?

  17. DavidONE says:

    Another worthy addition to the list is http://scienceblogs.com/deltoid/ . Tim’s running series of http://scienceblogs.com/deltoid/the_war_on_science/ focuses on one publication, The Australian, and their relentless propaganda campaign . Even if you’re not an Aussie, it’s an example of how some people / organisations are myopic in their denial of reality.

  18. One of the best things that us also-rans can do to support these web sites is to add links to them from our own blogs and web sites, increasing their relevancy in search engines. (We can also do the same to help each other).

    It matters. If Google comes across two web pages talking about the same issue, and one has 20 links pointing to it, and the other has 200, then the second will score higher in the search results. And that’s one thing we can do to start pushing the inactivist sites down in the rankings, by raising ours up. We can also push sites we like harder at places like digg, and start Facebook groups for Climate Progress and others. (With Joe’s permission, I might try to do that this weekend).

    Of course, that’s an over-simplification of a few principles of search engine optimization. And of course, not all links are created equal. A link from someone like me who is new to climate change blogging doesn’t count for much. A link from someone like Joe is a big deal. (Climate Progress gets a google page rank of 7/10… very high indeed! But the corollary is that Climate Audit scores just as highly.)

    So we have work to do!

    Another thing we should all do is make sure our links are up-to-date and lead to active web sites.

  19. Joe Campbell says:

    Hmmm, well my fav is Brave New Climate:

    http://bravenewclimate.com

    It has great items on climate science, anti-denialism, and energy solutions.

  20. Check out Mix Z at http://www.pitlick.com: Carbon meets Anti-Carbon

  21. Frank says:

    This is one of my favorites among the lighter-touch blogs, and it provides regular round-ups of newsy stuff:

    http://australianclimatemadness.blogspot.com/

    My next one is sometimes a little more technical, but does cover political aspects:

    http://icecap.us/

  22. Paul says:

    Thanks for the list. I was able to bookmark a few new climate change blogs today; Excellent!

    …Looking forward to when these blogs become redundant – cause we r well on our way to executing a global Climate Change plan! Am I a dreamer?

  23. Frank says:

    No Paul, you are a fantasist. We do not have the first foggiest notion about how to plan climate. Climate is something we shall have to endure. Our knowledge of it is very poor, our computer models of it are a joke. But we have a big range of energy and food sources, excellent communications worldwide, and therefore lots of reasons to be extremely optimistic. Especially if money is not wasted in response to fatuous CO2 scare stories.

  24. Ray says:

    The elephant in the room is Watts Up With That.

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/

    Climate centric and the winner of “best science blog of 2008″ its science, its honest and its civil.

    [JR: You deniers, you crack me up. “Best science blog” — as if. Everyone knows that’s the Drudge Report. Sheesh!]

  25. Michael says:

    Try Climate Matters @ Columbia:

    http://climate.columbia.edu/blog/

  26. Ray says:

    JR, You claim Realclimate is science….that expands the definition to include about anything.

  27. Joe says:

    Ray — I have no idea what you are accusing me of, but RealClimate is certainly the best blog that is devoted almost exclusively to climate science, but they certainly do occasionally touch on other related subjects.

  28. Check out the anti-denier site Skeptical Science. Great site, and one I use as a resource whenever I need to debunk some denier’s anti-science:

    http://www.skepticalscience.com/

  29. TokyoTom says:

    Joe, I’ve been blogging on climate change and other environmental matters from a libertarian/conservative, economics perspective. This will be fresh to many liberals, as well as decent ammo against reflexive “skeptics” who would rather not recognize that free markets don’t work for common, unowned resources.

    http://mises.org/Community/blogs/tokyotom/default.aspx.

    Eli Rabett kindly put me up on his blogroll sometime back.