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Dude, Where’s my Carbon Permit?

By Joe Romm

"Dude, Where’s my Carbon Permit?"

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http://www.thedreamzone.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/dude_wheres_my_car.jpgI’d be interested in readers’ opinion of this silly segment from NPR’s Morning Edition, “Dude, Where’s My Cap-And-Trade Primer?

It’s funny, but the analogy makes little sense, and the whole thing is not terribly productive, I think.  I much prefer my musical chairs analogy from this NPR interview last month :)

Anti-cap-and-traders, feel free to do your thing, too!  That’s what weekend posts are for, no?

‹ After Bonn, a safe future for youth still in doubt

Collin Peterson: ‘Mixing Climate Change Together With Energy Independence’ Is Dumb ›

5 Responses to Dude, Where’s my Carbon Permit?

  1. jcwinnie says:

    Joe, how do I put a background image of a tombstone on a WordPress post?

    Then I could type:

    COPENHAGEN

    Died Stillborn

    Solutions provided promoted status quo approaches by vested interests.”

  2. jcwinnie says:

    HuffPostScript:

    “The FutureGen project holds great promise as a flagship facility to demonstrate carbon capture and storage at commercial scale,” Chu said in a statement. “Developing this technology is critically important for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. and around the world.”

    Negotiations for the FutureGen project have been going on since the Obama administration announced it would consider reviving the project. Under President George W. Bush, the project was canceled after cost overruns that a Congressional auditor later said were based on false projections.

    U.S. Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., called the plant’s revival a “historic moment.”

    “In my time in Congress, I can’t recall a project that has greater scientific and practical significance than FutureGen,” Durbin said.

    Post Post Script: “Lily Tomlin was right.”

  3. Lily Tomlin said

    “Things are going to get a lot worse, before they get worse”

    “No matter how cynical you get, it is impossible to keep up.”

    and “We’re all in this alone.”

  4. jcwinnie says:

    @Richard Pauli

    She also once noted how hard it is to be funny these days, when satire can’t keep up with the number of people who miss it entirely and use it as a script rather than a warning.