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Open Thread And Fracking Cartoon Of The Week

By Joe Romm  

"Open Thread And Fracking Cartoon Of The Week"

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Ten cyberpennies for your thoughts.

Shaken Not Stirred

And how about crowd-sourcing some real pennies for cartoonist, Stephanie McMillan, who has kindly given me permission to reprint her cartoons. She notes that “cartoonists are struggling and economically collapsing along with the newspapers that used to be our living.”

So I said I’d post the link to Paypal where you can donate to her if you like her cartoons.  CLICK HERE (then click where it says DONATE).

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‹ EPA Introduces Historic New Standards To Limit Industrial Carbon Pollution

SoCal’s New Sustainability Strategy Is An Impressive Step Forward ›

43 Responses to Open Thread And Fracking Cartoon Of The Week

  1. climatehawk1 says:

    Enjoyed reading the Reno Gazette-Journal story on John Christy, the University of Alabama climate scientist who claims to have refuted mainstream climate science by finding that the Sierra snowpack has not declined. (See also Should you believe anything John Christy and Roy Spencer say? from this blog (2008).)

    Over in the New Yorker this week, there was a nice piece on Exxon Mobil, its political power, and its view of the world (“Gusher,” by Steve Coll–here’s a brief summary . ExxonMobil, for one, is very confident that our future consists of fossil fuels as far as the eye can see.

    Next, my usual plug: Citizens’ Climate Lobby is pushing the Save Our Climate Act, H.R. 3242, which would establish an escalating tax on carbon, with the proceeds being returned to all Americans as an annual dividend payment. If you are concerned about global warming, one of the most effective things you can do is urge your Congressperson to cosponsor H.R. 3242. Another good thing to do, of course, is join CCL.

  2. Raul M. says:

    My friends think it should be enjoyable to have fresh veggies from a garden so I get to try my hand at veggie gardening again.
    The squash and peppers are coming up and looking good. Maybe even corn for the raccoons to pillage again this year. The raccoons make a purring sound When they have some really nice treat.
    It’s looking nice and productive.
    Happy gardening.

    • John Mason says:

      Great to hear you’re getting back into veg-growing, Raul! I often suspect that it keeps my sanity on an even keel in this crazy world we find ourselves in!

      Cheers – John

      • Ray Kondrasuk says:

        Possibly worthy counsel:

        If you want to be happy for a few hours…
        …get drunk.

        If you want to be happy for a few years…
        …get married.

        But if you want to be happy for life…
        …get a garden.

      • Raul M. says:

        Thanks John, gardening is fun.
        It’s sobering to be out caring for something that will be out there all of it’s time and knowing that it will be or not depending on the weather.
        By the way has anyone seen a current study of the UV rays and am I wrong to think that I should have my gardening done before the sun shines directly or after the sunset.

        • Raul M. says:

          Oops got to get my denial gear ready before looking at current truth.

        • Mulga Mumblebrain says:

          You need some sunlight for Vitamin D production, but not the intense radiation of the midday hours. Morning and evening are best, I find, because you get the sunsets and rises and the birds are most active.

  3. John B. says:

    Have there been any notable responses to the “50 Nasa Astronauts” letter this week?

  4. Tom King says:

    Like others, I’ve been curious why Climate Deniers are more common in Canada, Australia, and the USA. My old guess was the shared media. But a couple days ago I stumbled into the literature about hypomania, its delusions and its prevalence among entrepreneurs.
    It seems that the mere act of becoming an immigrant is somewhat self selective for the genes of self delusion. And delusion is an important business skill since it enhances our sense of possibilities while diminishing our sense of risk. But obviously there is a downside.
    So my question is, might immigrant nations be more vulnerable to delusions like Climate Denial?

    http://talentdevelop.com/articles/TheHypoEdge.html

    • Chris Lock says:

      I think that there are a lot of deniers in Canada, Australia and USA simply because these are large countries resource rich. Here in Canada we’ve got a fire sale going on: tar sands going fast and cheap. A poll, two years old now, says that fewer in Alberta and Saskatchewan believe in global warming than the rest of the country. http://www.ottawasun.com/news/canada/2010/01/04/12336476-sun.html

      There are regional differences even within each country. I am sure you’ll find a poll comparing Texans and Californians.

      On a related note
      Kinder Morgan announces a large expansion of its existing pipeline. This pipe goes from Alberta to here in Burnaby and Vancouver, just a couple of miles from here. In order for this to happen, more tankers will come through the harbour. Although well developed already, the port of Vancouver will need to be expanded and dredged further.

      http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/Environment/2012/04/12/Kinder_Morgan_plans_expansion/

      From 2007, the existing pipeline ruptured and sprayed oil over a neighbourhood.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjjhVnCfahs

    • Chris Lock says:

      And I’ve been wondering how this climate debate has been perverted by the internet. In the days before the internet would the deniers have had such a large forum? A friend and I have been wondering if there are professional trolls out there working for a variety of corporations, organizations and governments spreading falsehoods by posting on websites and social media websites. Sometimes it’s the same people with different aliases cross posting on different websites.

      • Mulga Mumblebrain says:

        You bet they are, and they and their amateur colleagues are given a free ride by the Rightwing MSM ‘moderators’. Here the Murdoch press simply censors contributions that do not concur with hard Right ideology, and the so-called ‘national broadcaster’ the ABC, was taken over by the hard Right under John Howard, our worst PM up to that time. It is now quite indistinguishable from the Murdoch sewer, and comments are ruthlessly censored. This favours the Right not just from preferencing them, but from the clear discouragement of the Left, because who wants to tap out a reasoned, cogent, non-insulting comment, to have it disappear, and, instead, to see post after post from malevolent imbeciles, ignoramuses and hate-filled bigots. The Internet, in the hands of the Right, has become an echo-chamber for the Dunning-Krugerites, who are convinced (probably correctly) that they are ‘winning’ (it’s another ego contest against the hated Left) because all they see are other idiots furiously in agreement with them.

    • Barry Saxifrage says:

      Australia, Canada and USA have some of the biggest carbon footprints per capita. And if you dig down you see that the states and provinces within these nations that have the biggest carbon footprints per capita are — surprise — the super heated hotbeds of climate denial. Also check the mpg on the car someone drives as a good indicator.

      There is nothing mysterious about why some regions are more full of denial than others.

      And don’t even get me started on frequent flyers!

  5. prokaryotes says:

    OP-ED COLUMNIST
    Cannibalize the Future
    By PAUL KRUGMAN

    One general rule of modern politics is that the people who talk most about future generations — who go around solemnly declaring that we’re burdening our children with debt — are, in practice, the people most eager to sacrifice our future for short-term political gain. You can see that principle at work in the House Republican budget, which starts with dire warnings about the evils of deficits, then calls for tax cuts that would make the deficit even bigger, offset only by the claim to have a secret plan to make up for the revenue losses somehow or other.

    And you can see it in the actions of Chris Christie, the governor of New Jersey, who talks loudly about acting responsibly but may actually be the least responsible governor the state has ever had.

    Mr. Christie’s big move — the one that will define his record — was his unilateral decision back in 2010 to cancel work that was already under way on a new rail tunnel linking New Jersey with New York. At the time, Mr. Christie claimed that he was just being fiscally responsible, while critics said that he had canceled the project just so he could raid it for funds.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/13/opinion/krugman-cannibalize-the-future.html

    There goes the clean energy future – trumped down by greed and corruption!

    • Mulga Mumblebrain says:

      If Governor Christie is the fellow I’m thinking of, he shares a notable characteristic with our new caste of billionaire mining plutocrats, who seem to have breakfasted, lunched, dined and snacked a little too greedily. The ‘Pickwickian body habitus’ seems de rigeur for our masters. As for children, the Right waxes indignant and defends the vested economic interest when advertising molestation of children is contested, or fast food fattening is condemned by paediatricians and the like, en masse. Asked to choose between profit maximisation and children’s welfare, there’s no contest. In any case the Right secretly despise children because they will be alive when they are dead (part of their repertoire of misanthropic drives)and other people’s children hardly rate at all, there being no property relationship as with one’s own issue. I’m sure that some entrepreneur somewhere is working on some ‘Modest Proposal’ to turn some profit out of children. We know what depths have already been plumbed.

    • Mulga Mumblebrain says:

      Yessiree! There celebrating big-time in north-east Japan, right now, at the boon of nuclear power, and if the cooling ponds with all those spent fuel rods collapse and the rods catch fire, we can all join the party.

      • John Tucker says:

        Still Mulga the occasional mess is nothing compared to what is coming with Acidification and Climate change.

        There is a new reactor coming on line in India I believe that may hold more promise as a safer solution. Esp considering spent nuclear fuel and nuclear weapon decommissioning(?) Also the generation 3+ are much safer than most of the japanese reactors.

      • John Tucker says:

        Here is a link.

        Kalpakkam PFBR ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prototype_Fast_Breeder_Reactor )

        If it docent blow up it will be really cool !! Hehehe j/k – Its less prone to catastrophic core meltdowns but engineering the liquid sodium cooling has been tricky.

        While probably not suitable for all locations and occasions, if it can be made to work safely in some situations it will guarantee a large supply of high capacity base-load power. Nearly forever.

  6. John Tucker says:

    Already 2 of the used to be rather rare PDS warnings up.

    ( http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/watch/ )

    And tornadoes already observed:

    ( http://www.spc.noaa.gov/climo/reports/today.html )

  7. John Tucker says:

    here is that wind map thing again:

    http://hint.fm/wind/

  8. John Tucker says:

    Also here is another story with a pic from that hail storm in the Texas panhandle Wednesday:

    The hail was “real small” but there was a lot of it in a concentrated area, accumulating 2- to 4-feet deep, he said.

    ( http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2012/04/12/storm-dumps-waist-high-hail-in-texas-panhandle/#ixzz1s3a4svO6 )

  9. Raul M. says:

    Looking at the wiki entry for ozone and ozone depletion- still as completely bad as it looks it seems they have under estimated the bad as the Arctic ozone hole opened up last year and the animation only shows the worst at the year 2060.
    I would guess that the night life will be the norm but critters wouldn’t change so also being a vegetarian will be the norm.
    The spirit at the end times is to build a civilization based on combustion and it is foretold that the sprit will live evermore up in the sky. Yep that seems like combustion and the pollution and the sprit of human endeavors.
    Humm Humm looking looking
    My calculations must be wrong humm humm looking looking

  10. John Tucker says:

    Live Coverage out of Wichita Kansas.

    ( http://www.kwch.com/weather/alwayson/ )

  11. John Tucker says:

    A heck of a frontal line has formed up behind all this mess is moving through N Texas and Oklahoma. ( http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=fdr&overlays=11101111&product=N0Z&loop=yes )

  12. retiredbill says:

    Please excuse a question not directly related to climate change. I’ve been reading this blog using SharpReader for some time now, but a couple of weeks ago, it stopped listing any posts. No other blogs I follow were affected. I get “Error parsing RSS XML”. I can still read this blog using Internet Explorer, but it is a PITA since it doesn’t identify new posts or list posts separately. Which RSS readers do other people use with Windows?
    Thanks, Bill

  13. NASA data for last month shows that it was the 14th warmest March on record globally:

    http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/tabledata_v3/GLB.Ts+dSST.txt

    The NASA global map shows that North America was exceptionally warm, while Europe and the Arctic were also warmer than average. Alaska, the Middle East, and Australia were cooler than average.

    http://data.giss.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/gistemp/do_nmap.py?year_last=2012&month_last=3&sat=4&sst=1&type=anoms&mean_gen=03&year1=2012&year2=2012&base1=1951&base2=1980&radius=1200&pol=reg

    • Joan Savage says:

      Thanks for the links.
      I count it as 17th, with the first March that exceeded occurring in 1988.