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July 27 News: Apple May Power New Reno Data Center Entirely With Clean Energy

By Climate Guest Contributor

"July 27 News: Apple May Power New Reno Data Center Entirely With Clean Energy"

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Powerhouse Museum, via Flickr

Apple is producing enough clean power, through solar panels and fuel cells, at its data center in North Carolina that it says it can cover 60 percent of the total energy needs of the data center. Will the tech giant be doing the same thing at its new planned $1 billion data center just outside of Reno, Nevada? While details are few at this point, it sure looks like Apple is looking to have a significant amount of its data center power needs met with clean, and grid-independent, power. [GigaOM]

The percentage of buyers willing to consider an all-electric model has deteriorated since January from a bit over 5% to about 4.5% as of last month, CNW Research says. That might not sound like much until you consider it translates into 25,000 to 40,000 potential sales a year. The other bad news for electric car fans is that buyers say they aren’t willing to pay more than $800 for an electric car compared to a conventional car. In January, it was $850, CNW says. [USA Today]

The oil and natural-gas production boom sweeping the U.S. may be good for the country’s economic health, but it hasn’t recently been much help to energy giant Exxon Mobil Corp. Lackluster second-quarter financial results from Exxon’s U.S. oil and natural-gas production cast a shadow on the record global profit the company reported Thursday. [Wall Street Journal]

A U.S. Energy Department program designed to promote use of alternative fuels for vehicles gave out about $5 million in grants to individuals with conflicts of interest, the agency’s inspector general said. [Bloomberg]

Strong summer thunderstorms that pump water high into the upper atmosphere pose a threat to the protective ozone layer over the United States, researchers said on Thursday, drawing one of the first links between climate change and ozone loss over populated areas. [New York Times]

A new study produced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has shown that every state in the United States of America has the space and resources to generate clean energy. [Clean Technica]
-Max Frankel

 

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4 Responses to July 27 News: Apple May Power New Reno Data Center Entirely With Clean Energy

  1. We were just discussing the negative impact of bad climate headlines, in relation to Greenland and the NYT.

    The NREL headline here might be a case of the reverse.

    I love the headline, and the concept of the study.

    The study itself is a GIS exercise making use of a lot of existing data and thus carries forward bad assumptions in some of that data – particularly in the area of supposedly-renewable biomass, like forest biomass, which in fact tends to cause net release of GHG emissions.

    Another quickly-identified squishy area is urban PV potential. It’s hard to see why a study that “establishes an upper-boundary estimate of development potential” would systematically exclude parking lots from the area of PV potential.

    I’m sure that every state has renewable energy potential, and I hope more people will understand that. I wouldn’t put much faith in the quantitative estimates presented in this NREL study.

  2. Jim says:

    Sorry if I’m going off topic. Does anyone know what is going on over at WUWT? Shutting down? Or just a stunt to get more hits?

  3. Anne van der Bom says:

    “The other bad news for electric car fans is that buyers say they aren’t willing to pay more than $800 for an electric car compared to a conventional car”

    People aren’t even factoring in the lower fuel costs. An electric car that is only $800 more is actually a lot cheaper. You’ll save that $800 in less than 2 years on petrol. So actually, they want it cheaper.

    Which makes sense. If you’re doing something good for the environment, doesn’t that deserves a reward? Who wants to create a better world for nothing?