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Along With Severe Drought, Some Farmers Deal With A ‘Wall Of Sand’ Covering Fields Due To Last Year’s Floods

By Stephen Lacey  

"Along With Severe Drought, Some Farmers Deal With A ‘Wall Of Sand’ Covering Fields Due To Last Year’s Floods"

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This summer, everyone’s attention has turned to the severe drought, which now covers 63 percent of the U.S. But last year, the story was all about freak rainstorms that dumped water up to 600 percent over normal levels in some areas, swelling the Missouri River and wiping out farmland.

So today, some farmers in the Missouri River Valley aren’t just dealing with drought. They’re now dealing with piles of sand — in some cases 3-4 feet deep — covering their fields after the flood waters receded. These farmers are looking at tens of millions of dollars in damages.

It’s another example of the one-two punch that extreme weather brings. As the atmosphere warms due to accumulating greenhouse gases, it holds more water vapor. Therefore, when storms come, the rain is stronger. But in drought conditions, the impacts can be exacerbated by higher evaporation rates.

So we set the stage for more problems like this:

 

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3 Responses to Along With Severe Drought, Some Farmers Deal With A ‘Wall Of Sand’ Covering Fields Due To Last Year’s Floods

  1. We need to be seeing the old Chiffon Margarine commercials with the “It’s not nice to fool Mother Nature” theme. Of course the irony of that one is the fact that the margarine was a heart attack waiting to happen. Might be like some geo-engineering proposals.

  2. From Peru says:

    This dry and sand-covered soil isn’t the most vulnerable one to the attack of strong winds?

    If strong winds develop, could again big clouds of dust engulf entire cities like in the 1930s?