Tumblr Icon RSS Icon

Eric Cantor Skipped The March On Washington To Meet With Oil Lobbyists

By Rebecca Leber

"Eric Cantor Skipped The March On Washington To Meet With Oil Lobbyists"

Share:

google plus icon
Boehner and Cantor at a 2012 press conference.

Boehner and Cantor at a 2012 press conference.

CREDIT: AP

Not a single Republican lawmaker was at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington on Wednesday, an event headlined by civil rights icons, Democratic leaders, and President Obama. Top Republicans all declined their invitations citing “scheduling conflicts or ill health.”

Rather than attend the event, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R) instead met with oil and gas lobbyists in North Dakota, where he toured drilling sites in the North Dakota Bakken. According to the Grand Forks Herald, Cantor met with members of the lobby group, North Dakota Petroleum Council.

After his tour, Cantor rebuked Obama for not making fossil fuel interests his top priority:

Alex Seitz-Wald writes that House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH), who also respectfully declined to attend the march anniversary, was most likely fundraising in Wyoming.

Unlike civil rights advocates, the oil and gas industry has deep pockets to attract Republican candidates. North Dakota Petroleum Council has major GOP industry donors sitting on its Board of Directors, including executives from ConocoPhillilps, Marathon Oil, and Continental Resources. For instance, Continental CEO Harold Hamm has donated millions of dollars to GOP super PACs.

Over the course of his congressional career, Cantor has received more than $600,000 from the oil and gas industry, while Republicans overall receive 90 percent of the oil industry’s federal contributions. The same lawmakers have repeatedly voted to uphold billions of dollars in industry subsidies.

‹ Eight Years After Katrina, New Orleans Is A Monument Of Both Hope And Future Climate Threats

Are Ken Cuccinelli’s Ties to Big Coal And Gas Hurting Him In Deeply Red Southwest Virginia? ›

By clicking and submitting a comment I acknowledge the ThinkProgress Privacy Policy and agree to the ThinkProgress Terms of Use. I understand that my comments are also being governed by Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, or Hotmail’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policies as applicable, which can be found here.