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Climate Stories You Missed While Watching The World Cup

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"Climate Stories You Missed While Watching The World Cup"

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So you filled in coach Jürgen Klinsmann’s tweeted note to get out of work. And you decided that seeing images of all the flooding in Brazil at the site of the U.S.-German match filled your quota of climate news for the day.

Well, Climate Progress is ever-vigilant and multi-tasking. Heck, we skipped the after-party so you could just keep dancing on the bar! Here is what you missed:

  • Politico delivered its must-read analysis, “Barack Obama becomes mocker-in-chief on climate change skeptics.” Yes, you knew President Obama spoke Wednesday night at a League of Conservation Voters gala. But only Politico has the bombshell scoop from White House political director David Simas, who said “Humor is a very, very good thing — especially in a place where voters just don’t understand why folks in Washington don’t get what they get.” CP could not agree more with Simas.
  • The New Yorker’s satirical piece somehow connecting “Mad Men” to global warming: “Prestige TV in the time of climate change.” It opens:

    Marci was watching television in her fourth-floor walk-up on West Twenty-first Street on the day the water reached the base of the streetlights. She stood up from her couch and let her carton of chocolate coconut Bliss fall to the floor. “Holy shit,” she said. “Don and Peggy do hook up. I knew it. I mean, I didn’t know it. But, on some level, I knew it.”

  • The award-winning sketch comedy team Temple Horses skewers the media with their report, “In Depth: Climate Change”:

  • The Guardian takes on the clown car that is the denialist camp, with “Global warming conspiracy theorist zombies devour Telegraph and Fox News brains.” Environmental scientist Dana Nuccitelli re-debunks “the long-debunked conspiracy theorist myth that scientists are falsifying temperature data to conjure global warming and frighten the masses.”

    The piece ends with some great advice for journalists who want to avoid being suckered by the umpteenth pie in the face from the deniers:

    Some advice for journalists — the next time you hear a global warming myth that sounds too good to be true, before letting the zombie snack on your brains, check SkepticalScience.com first to see if it’s riddled with scientific debunking bullet wounds.

  • Tamino dismantles the deniers’ phony attacks on leading climatologist Michael Mann, with “Anthony Watts and the Bottom of the Barrel.” Bottom line: “What’s the take-home message here? That Anthony Watts and his crew are so eager to criticize global warming that they can’t be bothered to get the facts straight first. Even when it’s easy to do so. Even when there are multiple ways to do so.”

    Who takes these guys seriously anymore?

  • Finally, I’m pretty sure you missed the latest NOAA-led study on the dangerously high methane leakage rates of natural gas drilling — because NOAA doesn’t seem to have put out a press release on it. I guess they think this once-controversial finding is now old news.

    Scientific American (via Climate Wire) is one of the few outlets with the story, “Leaky Methane Makes Natural Gas Bad for Global Warming” :

    Natural gas fields globally may be leaking enough methane, a potent greenhouse gas, to make the fuel as polluting as coal for the climate over the next few decades, according to a pair of studies published last week.

    An even worse finding for the United States in terms of greenhouse gases is that some of its oil and gas fields are emitting more methane than the industry does, on average, in the rest of the world, the research suggests.

    I guess that makes America’s big push on fracking and LNG as part of our climate-action effort the World Cup equivalent of an own goal.

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