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McCain’ Missing Poverty Plan

By Guest Contributor on August 26, 2008 at 12:11 pm

"McCain’ Missing Poverty Plan"

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Our guest blogger is Brian Levine, a senior policy advisor at the Center for American Progress Action Fund.

This morning, we learned that 37.3 million Americans are living in poverty. Every year, the release of these numbers brings a wave of attention to the plight of the poor. This year, it might even prompt some curious voters to check out the websites of the presidential candidates. But don’t bother scouring JohnMcCain.com looking for the Senator’s poverty plan – it doesn’t exist.

Visitors to JohnMcCain.com can learn where the Republican nominee stands on the Second Amendment, “liberal judicial activists” — even the space program. While John McCain “understands the importance of investing in key industries such as space,” he apparently does not understand the importance of helping the 37.3 million Americans living in poverty right here on Planet Earth.

You can’t really blame John McCain for ignoring poverty. After all, it would take $90 billion a year to cut poverty in half. That might seem like a reasonable cost for lifting more than 18 million people over the poverty line. But McCain doesn’t have room in his budget – he needs $100 billion a year for his corporate tax break and there better be enough left over to deliver a $992,000 tax cut to each household in the top 0.1 percent of the income scale.

Maybe John McCain will come up with a poverty plan sometime between now and the election. In the meantime, at least we know that in a McCain Administration, the poor will be protected from activist judges and anti-astronaut zealots.

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