Tumblr Icon RSS Icon

Workers In Cambodia Injured As They Protest For Higher Pay

By Bryce Covert  

"Workers In Cambodia Injured As They Protest For Higher Pay"

Share:

google plus icon

Credit: Sky News

At least 23 workers were injured on Tuesday at a protest at a factory in Cambodia calling for higher wages when police with stun batons moved in to break it up, according to Sky News. A trade union representative said that a woman who was two months pregnant lost her baby after being pushed to the ground by police.

About 3,000 workers were taking part in the demonstration to demand higher wages from the factory, which manufactures clothes for Nike. The protesters want to be paid $14 more each month to help cover the cost of transportation, rent, and health care, on top of the minimum wage of $74 a month. The strikes and protests have been occurring since May 21.

A shoe factory also collapsed recently in Cambodia and killed two workers while injuring seven. An initial investigation found that the ceiling’s materials couldn’t support heavy weight.

Workers have similarly been protesting in Bangladesh following a fatal factory collapse that killed 1,127 in April. Up to 20,000 people took to the streets to demand better pay and working conditions and were also met with violence as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse them from occupying a road. The country also shut down 300 factories for three days as workers protested.

In response to the factory collapse, Bangladesh has said it will raise the minimum wage for garment workers and allow them to form unions without first getting approval from factory owners. Eight major retailers have also signed a factory safety upgrade agreement.

Tags:

‹ Switzerland Reportedly Ready To Help U.S. Crack Down On Tax Cheats

Europe Loosens Austerity Rules As Recession Deepens ›

By clicking and submitting a comment I acknowledge the ThinkProgress Privacy Policy and agree to the ThinkProgress Terms of Use. I understand that my comments are also being governed by Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, or Hotmail’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policies as applicable, which can be found here.