Economy

Marco Rubio Gets An ‘F’ On Net Neutrality

CREDIT: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) got an “F” on a op-ed that decried a recent decision by the Federal Communications Commission to regulate the Internet, commonly known as “net neutrality.”

Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) took a red pen to Rubio’s column for Politico magazine. Though Takano certainly took issue with Rubio’s mixed metaphor and inability to stick to length limits, Rubio ultimately earned such poor marks from the former high school English teacher due to factual errors, lack of research and “misleading” arguments.

Rubio argued that the rules give “an unelected, unaccountable board” an “extraordinary amount of power over the Internet.” But Takano wasn’t impressed, pointing out these “unelected bureaucrats” are all independently confirmed by the Senate, and that Rubio doesn’t seem to understand the Internet’s origins as a goverment project.

Read his take on Rubio’s op-ed below.

The FCC voted to enact net neutrality regulations last month, and released the full documentation of the rules last week. Though activists for fair access to the Internet largely view this as a victory, there are some concerns that the new rules will do little to block other problematic activities of the telecom industry and may carry few penalties for those who violate them.

Rubio, who also previously argued that net neutrality would open the door to foreign governments’ control of the Internet, isn’t the only Republican objecting to the new rules. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) famously called the plan “Obamacare for the Internet.” Some of that language was adopted by the Republican-appointed FCC officials who dissented in the net neutrality rules. House Republicans have also introduced legislation that would wipe out net neutrality, and FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has already been called to appear before five separate committee hearings to testify about alleged coordination between the bureaucratic body and the White House.

Takano also took his famous red pen to now-Sen. Bill Cassidy’s letter opposing immigration reform in 2013.