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DREAMers Fenced Off From Reuniting With Mothers At U.S.-Mexico Border

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"DREAMers Fenced Off From Reuniting With Mothers At U.S.-Mexico Border"

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(Credit: United We Dream)

In a heartbreaking video released on Tuesday, three DREAMers reunited with their mothers through a fence at the U.S./Mexican border, six years after they were separated by deportation. The happy, but ultimately sullen exchange in Nogales, AZ, was organized by United We Dream, an advocacy group that used the reunion to highlight the need for immigration reform, namely for family unification reasons.

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United We Dream spent two months raising airfare for the mothers of the three DREAMers, a process that would have been difficult had these women tried to pay for their own tickets. Although the reunion reflected a sobering reality of the current broken state of the immigration system, the three immigrants are by all accounts lucky to even be able to briefly recount missed milestones with their mothers in person. The majority of the estimated two million DREAMers do not have the backing of an advocacy group.

The three DREAMers will only be able to truly reunite with their mothers if a comprehensive immigration bill that grants travel authorization passes. The current immigration bill includes a provision which allows DREAMers an expedited pathway to citizenship and it faces the least opposition in an immigration bill that has faced much resistance.

On average, 1,400 undocumented immigrants are deported every day. Some are deported because they are trying to reunite with their families so it is unsurprising that illegal re-entry remains the top reason to initiate deportation proceedings.

Deportation also tears apart families where at least one member is a U.S. citizen. An estimated 205,000 individuals who were deported between 2010 to 2012, have U.S. born children.

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