Media Continues To Treat Anti-Health Care Decisions As More Important Than Pro-Health Care Decisions

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"Media Continues To Treat Anti-Health Care Decisions As More Important Than Pro-Health Care Decisions"

Yesterday’s decision rejecting a challenge to the Affordable Care Act was objectively the most important decision on this question to date. It was the first court of appeals decision to consider the issue, and the first case in which a judge crossed party lines — George W. Bush appointee Judge Jeffrey Sutton provided the key vote rejecting the plaintiffs’ claim.

Nevertheless, as Steve Benen demonstrates, major media outlets continue to treat pro-Affordable Care Act decisions as far less important than anti-Affordable Care Act decisions:

Washington Post
* 6th Circuit ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A5, 1053 words
* Steeh ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A2, 607 words
* Moon ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page B5, 507 words
* Hudson ruling (against the ACA): article on page A1, 1624 words
* Vinson ruling (against the ACA): article on page A1, 1176 words
* Kessler ruling (upholding the ACA): no article, zero words

New York Times
* 6th Circuit ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A15, 853 words
* Steeh ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A15, 416 words
* Moon ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A24, 335 words
* Hudson ruling (against the ACA): article on page A1, 1320 words
* Vinson ruling (against the ACA): article on page A1, 1192 words
* Kessler ruling (upholding the ACA): article on page A14, 488 words

Associated Press
* 6th Circuit ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 832 words
* Steeh ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 474 words
* Moon ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 375 words
* Hudson ruling (against the ACA): one piece, 915 words
* Vinson ruling (against the ACA): one piece, 1164 words
* Kessler ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 595 words

Politico
* 6th Circuit ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 940 words
* Steeh ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 830 words
* Moon ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 535 words
* Hudson ruling (against the ACA): three pieces, 2734 words
* Vinson ruling (against the ACA): four pieces, 3437 words
* Kessler ruling (upholding the ACA): one piece, 702 words

Indeed, coverage of anti-ACA decisions has so overwhelmed coverage of the pro-ACA decisions that all but one outlet has published more total words on the former — despite the fact that twice as many courts have supported the law as have struck it down:

As Benen explains, “The news-consuming public doesn’t necessarily follow the details of these legal developments, and Americans find important what the media tells them is important. With that in mind, it seems very likely the public has been left with the impression that the health care law is legally dubious and struggling badly in the courts because that’s what news organizations have told them to believe — rulings the right likes get trumpeted; rulings the left likes get downplayed.”

Update

Politico, to their credit, just posted a lengthy and excellent piece discussing Judge Sutton’s decision.

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