Senator Vows To Introduce New Assault Weapons Ban On The First Day Of Congress

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"Senator Vows To Introduce New Assault Weapons Ban On The First Day Of Congress"

On MSNBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ Sunday morning, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) promised to introduce a new assault weapons ban on the first day of the new Congress, challenging President Obama to back the bill. Feinstein sponsored the federal assault weapons ban that expired in 2004, and has been working on a new ban since the Aurora movie theater shooting in July. Four shooting sprees later, Feinstein has vowed to introduce the legislation on the first day of the 113th Congress.

Feinstein’s assault weapons ban will force Obama to take a stance on gun control after many promises to address the issue. The senator told ‘Meet the Press’ host David Gregory that her ban would cover the sale and importation of assault weapons, certain kinds of bullets, big drums and extended magazines:

I can tell you that [Obama] is going to have a bill to lead on because it’s a first-day bill I’m going to introduce in the Senate and the same bill is going to be introduced in the House. A bill to ban assault weapons. It will ban the sale, the importation, and the possession — not retroactively but perspectively. And it will ban the same of big clips, drums, or strips of big bullets. So there will be a bill. We’ve been working on it now a year.

In the wake of the elementary school shooting in Newtown, CT on Friday that left 28 people dead, the majority of whom were children, Obama gave an emotional speech calling for lawmakers to put politics aside and “take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like these.” Gun control measures have wide support among Americans, including members of the National Rifle Association, the most powerful gun lobby in the world. The Newtown elementary school gunman, 20-year-old Adam Lanza, primarily used a Bushmaster .223 semi-automatic rifle.

Update

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) also announced Monday that he will prepare a ban on high-capacity clips, which he first introduced after the Aurora movie theater shooting.

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