Georgia Restores Gun Rights To Ex-Cop Who Tried To Sexually Assault A Woman With His Gun

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"Georgia Restores Gun Rights To Ex-Cop Who Tried To Sexually Assault A Woman With His Gun"

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A Georgia appeals courts decision upholding the sexual assault conviction of a former cop named Dennis Krauss is difficult to read. According to the record in Krauss’ trial, the former officer was dispatched to the home of a woman who called 911 alleging that her husband had hit her. Rather than arresting the husband, however, Krauss asked the victim to ride with him in his police car. Once she was in his car, “Krauss told the victim that he could take her to jail if he wanted to” or, if she did not want to be arrested, she could have sex with him instead. Krauss’ words, according to the court opinion, were “[w]e can go to the motel or you can go to jail.”

At the motel, Krauss drew his service weapon and told the woman that he wanted to anally penetrate her with the gun. When she refused, and began to cry, “Krauss then pushed her back, pulled off her pants, and had sex with her.” And then he drove her home to the same husband that led her to call the police in the first place.

Krauss was convicted of sexual assault against a person in custody, and this one instance of sexual assault is far from the only allegation against him. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, “[h]is record was filled with allegations of misconduct: that he beat a prisoner so severely the man’s brain bled; that he threatened to fabricate charges against a suspect so he could sleep with the man’s wife; that he pressured at least 10 women for sex to avoid arrest.” The former cop, for his part, is unrepentant. When asked about his sexual assault conviction, he claims that “[t]here wasn’t any crime,” and that “I was dealt a bad hand.”

And yet, in July of 2013, the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles restored Krauss’ right to carry a firearm. According to a Journal-Constitution tally, he is one of 358 violent felons who regained these rights over a six year period. That includes 32 violent felons who killed someone, and 44 who committed sex crimes. One man regained his right to own a gun in 2012 after serving a 10 year sentence for child molestation and aggravated child molestation. Some offenders regained their gun rights after being convicted of crimes such as armed robbery, burglary or aggravated assault.

The pardon board’s decisions to restore gun rights to these offenders is consistent with a broader culture of permissiveness regarding firearms that pervades Georgia’s government. Last April, Gov. Nathan Deal (R) signed a bill that former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords’ organization, Americans for Responsible Solutions, described as “the most extreme gun bill in America.” The new law permits guns in bars, churches, nightclubs and libraries. It eliminates criminal charges against people who bring guns into places, such as airports, where firearms are forbidden. It expands the state’s Stand Your Ground law to allow felons to invoke this defense. And it permits certain teachers and school administrators to carry guns inside their schools.

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