Justice

Nevada Lawmaker Says Racism Is Over, Then Refers To Colleague As ‘Colored’

CREDIT: AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File

Nevada Assemblywoman Michele Fiore (R)

In comments defending a proposed voter ID law, Nevada Assemblywoman Michele Fiore (R) suggested that racism is over, so opponents should no longer be “using the race card.” She then used an offensive racial term common in the 1960s to describe an African American colleague.

According to the Las Vegas Review Journal, Fiore objected to witness testimony that the voter ID proposal would disproportionately disenfranchise minority voters, as similar laws have already done in other states. “We’re in 2015 and we have a black president, in case anyone didn’t notice,” she observed during a committee hearing on the bill. Fiore also asked the Nevada director of the NAACP National Voter Fund, “At what point do we stop dividing by design? And at what point do we stop using the race card?”

Fiore also identified Assemblyman Harvey Munford (D) as the first “colored man to graduate from his high school.”

In recent weeks, Fiore has made national headlines for her suggestions that cancer is a fungus that can simply be washed out and that “hot little girls on campus” need to carry guns to prevent rape. She was removed from her position as Republican Majority Leader in December over allegations of more than $1 million in tax liens.

In 2012, she proposed arming school officials and college students as a way of combating school shootings.

The Republican majority in the Nevada legislature has made clear that voter ID is a high priority since winning control last November. But supporters struggled at the hearing to identify any actual examples of voter fraud that would have been prevented by requiring photo ID at the polls.