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The Morning Pride: April 20, 2012

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"The Morning Pride: April 20, 2012"

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Welcome to The Morning Pride, ThinkProgress LGBT’s daily round-up of the latest in LGBT policy, politics, and some culture too! Here’s what we’re reading this morning, but please let us know what stories you’re following as well. Follow us all day on Twitter at @TPEquality.

- Today is the Day of Silence, when young people silently protest the mistreatment and stigmatization of LGBT youth in schools across the country.

- Concerned Women for America’s Linda Harvey’s list of reasons to boycott the Day of Silence contains the vile anti-gay and anti-trans rhetoric that encapsulates why protest is necessary.

- Is Invisible Children trying to usurp the Day of Silence with its own t-shirt campaign today, complete with pink upside-down triangles that are normally an LGBT symbol?

- The Tennessee Senate approved the “Religious Viewpoints Anti-Discrimination Act,” which (further) opens school doors to prayer and provides an extra sphere of protection for religious speech — presumably including anti-gay rhetoric. The House has yet to vote on it.

- The Louisiana legislature has shelved an anti-bullying bill after gutting LGBT protections from it.

- WFMY News, a North Carolina CBS affiliate, dedicated a detailed segment to explaining the potential impact of the discriminatory Amendment One.

- Josh Hutcherson of The Hunger Games and The Kids Are All Right has said that he is more proud of his efforts to support gay rights than any of his acting roles.

- Two anti-bullying videos for the Day of Silence: Duke University students staff and faculty have made an “It Gets Better” video in advance of North Carolina’s Amendment One, while Illinois students have sent a message out to their 40-year-old selves about the challenges of being LGBT in school:

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