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North Carolina Lawmaker Flip-Flops On Discriminatory Amendment He Supported

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"North Carolina Lawmaker Flip-Flops On Discriminatory Amendment He Supported"

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North Carolina Rep. Jim Crawford (D)

North Carolina Rep. Jim Crawford (D) was one of 10 Democrats who voted in favor of placing Amendment One on the May 8 ballot, a measure that would ban not only same-sex marriage, but also civil unions and domestic partnerships. He sponsored an almost identical amendment in 2009, and co-sponsored a similar amendment in 2010. Now, though, he says he opposes the measure because “it goes too far” and claims he never favored the version that passed:

CRAWFORD: When this legislation was introduced, it did not have the contract problems that the bill has now, and I told Elaine the other day that I would vote against this bill because it does go too far. I think it’s only right that these folks [same-sex couples] can have a contract or an agreement so that they can look after each other in the hospitals, have insurance, and the other benefits. The legislation that has my name on it — it got changed considerably, and I would not support that legislation and I would definitely vote against it.

Watch him change his position in response to a recent confrontation with a lesbian constituent:

Given that Crawford voted for the amendment in its final form, he bears responsibility for all the changes that were made to it. His past support for banning same-sex marriage suggests his sudden flip-flop has little to do with an actual change of heart. Due to redistricting, Crawford faces a Democratic primary against fellow incumbent Rep. Winkie Wilkins (D), who voted against Amendment One. This is little more than political pandering from a well-documented opponent of LGBT equality.

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