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More Invisible Families As Utah School Restricts Two-Moms Book

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"More Invisible Families As Utah School Restricts Two-Moms Book"

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Another school is trying to “protect” kids from learning that some families have two moms or two dads, a lesson that some parents feel they need to consent to. At Davis County School District in Utah, a whopping 25 parents petitioned the board of librarians arguing that the book In Our Mothers’ House should not be publicly available to kindergartners. The book was not outright banned, but will be kept behind the librarian’s desk and must be specifically requested.

Fox 13 reached out to the book’s author, Patricia Polacco, for comment. She described what once happened during a classroom visit that inspired her to write the book:

POLACCO: What if you are raising a gay child and the child doesn’t know they’re gay and all they’ve heard is derision and criticism for that way of life? [...]

One little girl stood up, started to read about her family, and was immediately stopped actually by an aide — not the teacher, I think the teacher had left the room — [who] said “Oh no, Virginia, you don’t come from a real family. Sit down.” That little girl actually came to me at the end of the day sobbing and said, “Mrs. Polacco, are you ever going to write about us? About families like us?” And I said, “You know, I promise you I will.”

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In situations like both this one and the Illinois school discussed earlier today, it’s important to note that there is nothing to substantiate claims that kids are incapable of understanding diverse families. The problem is that the parents are uncomfortable answering questions about the existence of same-sex couples. This raises the question: How do these families respond when their kids’ classmates have same-sex parents?

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