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Baltimore Sun Editorial Calls Out ‘Spurious Arguments’ Made By Marriage Equality Opponents

By Zack Ford on August 27, 2012 at 5:10 pm

"Baltimore Sun Editorial Calls Out ‘Spurious Arguments’ Made By Marriage Equality Opponents"

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Yesterday, the Baltimore Sun editorial board condemned the Maryland Marriage Alliance for its “spurious arguments” that marriage equality will somehow impact school curricula or the rights of business owners. The editorial correctly points out that the Maryland General Assembly’s marriage equality law did nothing to impose on school curriculum, which is maintained by superintendents and school boards. Similarly, public accommodations are already protected under state law, and thus business owners are no more entitled to refuse to serve same-sex couples now than they would be if those couples’ relationships are recognized. The Baltimore Sun concludes with a bold endorsement of Question 6:

The opponents are resorting to spurious arguments to convince voters that the law will somehow be unfair to those with objections to gay marriages because they don’t want to face the real question of fairness at stake. Should the law treat people differently because of their sexual orientation? Or should everyone be treated equally? Maryland’s gay marriage ordinance doesn’t require anyone to violate their religious beliefs or personal conscience. As much as we hope the debate over this issue will persuade everyone in the state of the value of acceptance and tolerance, the law doesn’t force anyone to change the way they think. All it does is to remove a major vestige of discrimination from state law, and that is something all Marylanders should be able to support.

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