Fischer Doubles Down: School Diversity Celebration Is Like ‘Poisoned Halloween Candy’

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"Fischer Doubles Down: School Diversity Celebration Is Like ‘Poisoned Halloween Candy’"

The American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer has been railing against the Southern Poverty Law Center’s “Mix It Up at Lunch” day, where students are encouraged to simply connect with someone new at lunch on October 30. Fischer told the New York Times that the day “punishes Christian students” who don’t approve of homosexuality, and he doubled down on those comments in a CNN interview this morning, comparing the day to Halloween candy that has been laced with cyanide:

FISCHER: Parents need to understand that this is about pressuring public schools and students in public schools to accept homosexuality as a normal healthy alternative to heterosexuality. You know, it’s interesting to me that they’re doing this October 30, the day before Halloween, and what this problem is, it’s like poisoned Halloween candy. Somebody takes a candy bar, injects it with cyanide, the label looks fine, it looks innocuous, it looks fine — it’s not until you internalize it that you realize how toxic it is. And we want parents to be aware that any program that comes from the Southern Poverty Law Center is going to be toxic to their student’s moral health.

CNN anchor Carol Costello challenged Fischer’s ideas, reminding viewers that he has claimed that the Nazis recruited gay stormtroopers because they were more ruthless. Watch the full interview (via Equality Matters):

At the end of the interview, Costello cut him off, pointing out he was spewing untruths. She concluded the segment by saying, “Thanks for sharing your views, I guess.” Fischer claimed on Twitter that she “interrupted me more than Alan Colmes, which I heretofore thought was humanly impossible.”

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