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How Today’s Election Could Make History For LGBT Equality

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"How Today’s Election Could Make History For LGBT Equality"

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By now, hopefully all are aware of the stakes of today’s election and the impact it could have on the future of LGBT equality. Chris Geidner has a round-up of the races to watch, including LGBT candidates and the four ballot measures. But here are some of the many ways that today’s results could be historic:

  • If Barack Obama (D) is re-elected, it’ll be the first time a President has been elected who openly supports marriage equality.
  • If Tammy Baldwin (D) wins her Senate race in Wisconsin, she will become the first openly LGBT member of the Senate.
  • If Mark Pocan (D) is elected to fill Baldwin’s House seat, it would be the first time an openly LGBT member of Congress is succeeded by another openly LGBT member.
  • If Arizona elects Kyrsten Sinema (D) to the House, she will be the first openly bisexual member of Congress.
  • If Mark Takano (D) wins his California seat, he will become the first openly LGBT person of color in Congress.
  • If Richard Tisei (R) defeats incumbent and LGBT ally John Tierney (D) in Massachusetts, he will be the first Republican elected to Congress who was out to his constituents before running.
  • If Maine approves Question 1, it will become the first state to legalize same-sex marriage entirely through a popular vote process.
  • If Maryland approves Question 6 and Washington approves Referendum 74, they will also make history as the first states to uphold marriage equality laws at the ballot.
  • Minnesota also has the chance to make history by being the first state to defeat a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. (In 2006, Arizona voters did reject a constitutional amendment banning both same-sex marriage and civil unions, but then passed an amendment in 2008 banning only marriage.)
  • A number of states could also elect their first openly LGBT state legislators, including Pennsylvania, North Dakota, Delaware, and West Virginia.

Any of these victories will be an important indicator of how the tide continues to turn for LGBT equality.

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