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The Morning Pride: April 23, 2013

By Zack Ford  

"The Morning Pride: April 23, 2013"

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Welcome to The Morning Pride, ThinkProgress LGBT’s daily round-up of the latest in LGBT policy, politics, and some culture too! Here’s what we’re reading this morning, but please let us know what stories you’re following as well. Follow us all day on Twitter at @TPEquality.

- Today the Rhode Island Senate Judiciary Committee will consider two marriage equality bills, one that matches the House bill that already passed, and one that puts the question to a referendum. A previous version of the referendum bill would have allowed businesses to discriminate, but this new version does not include those “protections.”

- Former Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-AZ) testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday about the importance of protecting same-sex couples in immigration reform, including his own eight-year relationship with Panama native Hector Alfonso. Read his full remarks or watch them.

- The Second Circuit Court of Appeals is giving the National Organization for Marriage a second chance to hide its donors from New York election law.

- Joe Bell, father of Oregon gay teenager Jadin Bell who committed suicide in January, is walking across the United States to raise awareness about bullying.

- The Community of Christ Church, an offshoot of the Mormon Church, is considering the ordination of gay priests and allowing same-sex couples to marry.

- Paraguay’s newly elected President has apologized (“to those who felt offended”) for saying he would “shoot himself in the testicles” if his son were gay.

- Filmmaker Todd Bieber  found a creative way to introduce some gay role models to some Boy Scouts he was mentoring:

‹ NOM Endorses ‘Right To Refuse Service To Anybody’ For Being Gay

Nevada Senator Comes Out As Senate Approves Repeal Of Same-Sex Marriage Ban ›

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