The Morning Pride: August 23, 2013

Posted on

"The Morning Pride: August 23, 2013"

Welcome to The Morning Pride, ThinkProgress LGBT’s daily round-up of the latest in LGBT policy, politics, and some culture too! Here’s what we’re reading this morning, but please let us know what stories you’re following as well. Follow us all day on Twitter at @TPEquality.

Pride Flag Banner 10

- USA Today, the New York Times, and many other outlets are more interested in talking about their use of the wrong pronouns for Chelsea Manning than actually correcting their mistakes.

- The Daily Beast published a truly offensive piece suggesting that prison is a pretty great place for transgender people.

- The Pennsylvania court handling the case of the county clerk handing out same-sex marriage licenses has many interesting questions about jurisdiction and standing.

- Homophobic San Antonio Councilwoman Elisa Chan continues to defend her anti-LGBT comments; she now explains that she has gay friends and she even hugs them.

- The ACLU is urging a Tennessee school to re-post “safe space” posters in classrooms, which were removed because of an “inappropriate sexual nature” and was too political — i.e. it mentioned LGBT people.

- The Oregon cabbie who left a lesbian couple on the side of the highway because they were being affectionate has lost his taxi license.

- Over 10,000 demonstrators protested Russia’s law against “gay propaganda” at Denmark’s Copenhagen Pride.

- Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe used his inauguration speech to once again attack the gay community, this time describing homosexuality as a “filthy, filthy disease.”

- Here are 30 of the many companies who offer trans-inclusive health care plans.

- A new documentary web series, TransMilitary, will portray the real-life stories of transgender soldiers who are prohibited from serving their country as their authentic gender. Here’s part one:

« »

By clicking and submitting a comment I acknowledge the ThinkProgress Privacy Policy and agree to the ThinkProgress Terms of Use. I understand that my comments are also being governed by Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, or Hotmail’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policies as applicable, which can be found here.