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DeLay: ‘I Cannot Run For Office’ In Texas, ‘I’m Ineligible’

By ThinkProgress  

"DeLay: ‘I Cannot Run For Office’ In Texas, ‘I’m Ineligible’"

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Earlier this month, a federal district court ruled that former Rep. Tom DeLay’s name must stay on the ballot in Texas even though he withdrew from the race and moved to Virginia. Recently, the media has reported that DeLay is planning an “aggressive campaign to retake the House seat” should the ruling be upheld on appeal.

Today on Fox, DeLay was asked by Neil Cavuto if he still had a chance to win the election. DeLay said, “I cannot run for office [in Texas]” because “I’m ineligible.” Watch it:

DeLay also trashed the federal district court decision as “a policy statement instead of a ruling” and expressed confidence that the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals would “turn it around.” Election Law blog explains that the ruling is on soild constitutional ground and argues that “there is good chance this opinion is upheld on appeal.”

Transcript:

CAVUTO: I’ve noticed now a judge has ruled you’re still on the ballot, so you could conceivably still win this thing. What’s the deal?

DELAY: Well, we had a Democrat federal judge make a policy statement instead of a ruling. I think the Fifth Circuit will look at the law, look at the constitution and understand that the voters of the 22nd district need a choice. I’m a resident of Virginia. I live in Virginia. I’m working in Virginia and Washington, DC. I’ve established a legal defense fund, a speakers bureau. I’m even working on a book and working with conservative groups. I’m making my living in Washington, DC, so by the Constitution, I cannot run for office and I’m ineligible. So I don’t know what this judge is doing, but I think the Fifth Circuit will turn it around.

‹ Senate Cover-up Committee update.

ThinkFast PM: July 12, 2006 ›

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