Wilson: Proponents Of Libby Pardon Are ‘Accessories To An Ongoing Crime’

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"Wilson: Proponents Of Libby Pardon Are ‘Accessories To An Ongoing Crime’"

In a recent interview with “In The Know TV,” a public affairs television show broadcast in the DC area, Joe Wilson — the husband of former CIA undercover agent Valerie Plame — spoke out about the potential pardoning of Scooter Libby.

Wilson argued, “Considering that this is an obstruction of justice case, and considering that the prosecutor has said repeatedly that there remains a cloud over the Vice President, it seems to me that those who are arguing for pardon are in fact accessories to an ongoing crime.” He said that until the cloud over Cheney is lifted, the ultimate crime cannot be said to have been punished.

Wilson also argued that Bush should recuse himself from any involvement with the Libby scandal. “The idea that the President would not recuse himself given the superior-subordinate relationship he had with Mr. Libby — and considering that it would be the first time that you would consider a pardon in a criminal investigation that involves perhaps the Office of the President, certainly the Office of the Vice President — would be totally inappropriate,” he said. Watch it:

[flv http://video.thinkprogress.org/2007/07/wilsonpardon.320.240.flv]

When asked his reaction to the fact that the White House has shown so much compassion for the Libby family without offering a public apology to his own family, Wilson said, “I would have thought that their parents would have raised them better.” He added, “I’ve actually learned not to expect anything from this crowd other than bad behavior.”

Bloomberg reports, “A quick pardon for Libby would go against Justice Department guidelines, which recommend that a supplicant wait five years after conviction or release from confinement before seeking a pardon.”

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