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Santorum Chastises ‘Feminist Community’ For Not Embracing Palin

By Ali Frick  

"Santorum Chastises ‘Feminist Community’ For Not Embracing Palin"

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santorum.jpgYesterday, former right-wing senator Rick Santorum heaped lavish praise on Gov. Sarah Palin (R-AK) on Laura Ingraham’s radio show. To explain why “feminists” haven’t jumped on the Palin bandwagon, Santorum declared that she is “the Clarence Thomas for feminists,” whom Santorum said African-Americans and civil rights groups “obviously” should have supported:

SANTORUM: Sarah Palin is the Clarence Thomas for feminists. The civil rights community, the African-American community obviously should have rallied behind Clarence Thomas an his achievement, but they hammered him because he was a conservative. And the civil rights establishment was first and foremost liberal and then for the liberal rights of — as liberals saw it, what blacks should have in this country. And the same thing with the feminist community.

Listen to it:

Since Santorum feels that all African-Americans should “obviously” have celebrated Thomas’ “achievement,” it’s unclear whether he realizes Thomas was not, in fact, the first black Supreme Court Justice. That “achievement” was made by the far more progressive Thurgood Marshall. Of course, neither is Palin the first female vice presidential candidate, that spot being taken by the progressive candidate Geraldine Ferraro.

Santorum finds it shocking that black Americans could have possibly opposed a black candidate for the Supreme Court — despite Thomas’s long history of standing in the way of civil rights. Not only is Thomas a well-known opponent of affirmative action, but also, while working at the Department of Education, he made it more difficult to file class action lawsuits for racial discrimination, which angered many civil rights groups.”

What’s more, Santorum’s praise for Palin’s so-called feminist perspective is bizarre, considering his own traditional opposition to working mothers. In his book, “It Takes a Family,” he blames “radical feminists” for refusing to acknowledge “the essential work women have done in being the primary caregivers” of children, and he rails on the selfishness of working parents:

In far too many families with young children, both parents are working, when, if they really took an honest look at the budget, they might confess that both of them really don’t need to, or at least may not need to work as much as they do… And for some parents, the purported need to provide things for their children simply provides a convenient rationalization for pursuing a gratifying career outside the home.

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