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McCaskill: ‘Sarah Palin Has Been An Earmark Queen In Alaska. That’s The Facts.’

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"McCaskill: ‘Sarah Palin Has Been An Earmark Queen In Alaska. That’s The Facts.’"

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This week on “The View,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) claimed that Sarah Palin had never requested earmarks as governor. Today on ABC’s “This Week,” campaign spokeswoman Carly Fiorina repeated the lie, claiming Palin did not request earmarks for Alaska:

FIORINA: Sarah Palin as governor stood up and said, I know earmarks are corrupting. We must ask for less of them–

STEPHANOPOLOUS: But she still requested them.

FIORINA: As governor she did not. [...]

MCCASKILL: Sarah Palin has been an earmark queen in Alaska. That’s the facts.

Stephanopolous corrected Fiorina when she falsely claimed that Palin had “rejected the money for the Bridge to Nowhere.” Watch it:

As ThinkProgress has documented, Palin has aggressively pursued earmark funding for her state as governor, requesting nearly $750 million in federal funds, “by far the largest per-capita request in the nation.” Just last March, Palin wrote an op-ed in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, explaining that her “role at the federal level is simply to submit the most well-conceived earmark requests we can.”

Fiorina’s assertion that it is a “fact” that Palin “rejected the money for the Bridge to Nowhere” is wrong. Once Congress removed the designation for the bridge from the earmark, Palin took the money and redirected it to other projects.

As Keith Ashdown, chief investigator for the watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense, pointed out, Palin’s constant claim to have said “thanks but no thanks” to the bridge earmark is simply a lie: “To say ‘thanks but no thanks’ would imply that they didn’t take the money. And they got every dime of it.”

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