Politics

McCain To Obama: Leave Limbaugh Alone!

Over the past week, the fealty of GOP lawmakers to hate radio host Rush Limbaugh has become increasingly clear. They have been reluctant to criticize his comment that he hopes Obama fails, and those who have spoken out have been forced to retract their statements and beg forgiveness from the hate radio host.

Today on Fox and Friends, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) further circled the wagons, saying that Obama shouldn’t have made critical remarks about Limbaugh (which were made in a private meeting with Republicans and then leaked to the press):

McCAIN: I don’t know why he would do that. Mr. Limbaugh is a voice of a significant portion of our conservative movement in America. He has a very wide viewing audience. He is entitled to his views, and he has a lot of people who listen very carefully to him. I don’t know why that the President would take him on. He’s part of the political landscape, and he plays a role.

Watch it:

In September 2007, Limbaugh controversially claimed that U.S. service members who support withdrawal from Iraq are actually “phony soldiers.” At the time, McCain spoke out against the remarks and called on Limbaugh to apologize:

Any American who risks his or her life to defend us has earned the respect and gratitude of every American citizen, irrespective of their views on this war. If Mr. Limbaugh made the remark he is reported to have made, it reflects very poorly on him and not the objects of his offensive comment. I expect most Americans, whatever their political views, will have the same reaction. He would be well advised to retract it and apologize.

So before the election, when McCain was trying to establish himself as a maverick, calling on Rush to criticize for his offensive remarks was fine. After the election, McCain appears more than happy to join his caucus as a ditto head.

Transcript:

CARLSON: Alright, senator, let me go back to politics for a minute, because I’m on Barack Obama’s calling out of Rush Limbaugh during his first week in office. Was that a strategical thing that he did, in other words, trying to say to more moderate Republicans, “You better not listen to Rush”? I mean, what was the whole point of doing that, and do you agree with the fact that he did that?

McCAIN: I don’t know why he would do that. Mr. Limbaugh is a voice of a significant portion of our conservative movement in America. He has a very wide viewing audience. He is entitled to his views, and he has a lot of people who listen very carefully to him. I don’t know why that the President would take him on. He’s part of the political landscape, and he plays a role.