Jim ‘Waterloo’ DeMint: ‘If We Lose The Health Care Battle, I Think We’ve Lost It All’

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"Jim ‘Waterloo’ DeMint: ‘If We Lose The Health Care Battle, I Think We’ve Lost It All’"

demint434 Yesterday on Glenn Beck’s radio program, Sen. Jim DeMint (R-SC) outlined the state of America under President Obama in apocalyptic terms, saying that health care was a must-win battle for Republicans, otherwise all would be lost. When Beck said that we are seeing “a fundamental transformation into a new system where the executive branch is almost if not all powerful,” DeMint replied:

DEMINT: We’re just, we’re coming down to a matter of days. If we lose the health care battle, I think we’ve lost it all. [...]

And that’s why I’ve said strong things like Waterloo and other things. This is, the nation has to focus on this because the czars and other things are secondary in a way if we lose health care, the president’s going to be so emboldened, we’re going to see so much more of the growth at the executive branch level that, I don’t think we’ll be able to stop it. But if we stop him on health care then I think we have the opportunity to maybe realign the whole political system in our country.

DeMint then said that he doesn’t “care which party it ends up being,” but quickly added, “I hope it’s the Republicans.” Listen here:

DeMint has been one of the leading lawmakers using hyperbolic rhetoric in the health care debate. Most famously, he said that health reform would be Obama’s “Waterloo” because it “will break him.” He has also said that the current debate was “a real showdown between socialism and freedom” and compared the U.S. government under Obama to Nazi Germany under Hitler: “We’ve got national socialism.”

Left out of all of DeMint’s exhortations is any acknowledgment of why health care reform is so necessary. As President Obama has responded, “What they don’t recognize is, this isn’t about me; it’s about the American people. And things have gotten worse since 1993.” New census numbers released this week showed that in 2008, the number of Americans without health insurance grew from 45.7 million to 46.3 million. Since 2000, the number has increased by 7.3 million.

Transcript:

BECK: I mean, senator, I guess the reason I bring this up is because you say, you have your fingers in the dike. And you do. God bless you, you do. They’re trying to pass health care. They’re trying to pass all these things. Why play their game? Why not, why not expose the thing. They’re doing that to keep your fingers in the dike.

DEMINT: Right.

BECK: Why not take your fingers out of the dike and say, “I ain’t playing your game.” Because you’re doing this this this and this. I mean, they, this is, correct me if I’m wrong and I hope you do. This is a fundamental transformation into a new system where the executive branch is almost if not all powerful.

DEMINT: Well, it feels like they’re moving that way. The problem is is when I start going after people personally then I get distracted from the policy itself, which I’m trying to fight against. We’re just, we’re coming down to a matter of days. If we lose the health care battle, I think we’ve lost it all.

BECK: I do too. I do too.

DEMINT: And that’s why I’ve said strong things like Waterloo and other things. This is, the nation has to focus on this because the czars and other things are secondary in a way if we lose health care, the president’s going to be so emboldened, we’re going to see so much more of the growth at the executive branch level that, I don’t think we’ll be able to stop it. But if we stop him on health care then I think we have the opportunity to maybe realign the whole political system in our country. Maybe get people to stand up. I don’t care which party it ends up being. I hope it’s the Republicans, but right now we don’t have a strong consensus pushing the country in the right direction from either part.

BECK: How is it that the Republican party really still thinks that they can go in and broker a deal when they don’t — I mean, does anybody understand that it is the pieces, the individual pieces that they’re putting into these bills that allow them to, you know, you know, you open up the door an inch to these people, and it doesn’t matter. In time they’ll have that door wide open and then they’ll take a chainsaw and cut it into a double door.

DEMINT: You’re right. If we pass anything right now in the current environment, it will turn into a monster regardless of how it looks when it actually passes the Senate.

BECK: Quickly.

DEMINT: And so that’s why its important that we stop this. We can’t pass anything in the next month or two and expect it to be good legislation.

BECK: But how do we get the attention of of the good Democrats, you know, the ones who are like, I’m not comfortable with the giangantic government and all of the control in the executive branch and the Republicans who are supposed to be standing for small government?

DEMINT: Well, I think you’re going to get all of the Republicans. I mean, we could lose one or two here, but I’m thinking a lot of their voters are keeping them accountable back home. The question of — I’m not sure we can get any Democrats in the Senate. They may be able to get some in the House. But if we can make the Congressman and Senators more afraid of their voters than they are of the special interests that are pushing this thing up here, we have a chance at it. And so there’s still some hope for some Democrats if people don’t relax. For the next month, people have to be more engaged and outraged than they’ve ever been. And if we do that, I think that we can stop it.

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