Graham: Beck is not the voice of conservatism.

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"Graham: Beck is not the voice of conservatism."

Last week, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) created waves when he dismissed the influence of Fox News host Glenn Beck, saying, “Only in America can you make that much money crying.” Beck commented on his radio show by responding, “Lindsey Graham hating my guts is probably the highest honor I’ve ever received. Judge me by my friends and judge me by my enemies. Thank you, Lindsey Graham.” Today on Fox News Sunday, host Brett Baier — standing in for Chris Wallace — stood up for his Fox colleague and asked Graham, “Are you saying that Glenn Beck is bad for America?” Graham rejected that characterization, but said that Beck did not speak for conservatives or Republicans:

GRAHAM: No, I’m not saying he’s bad for America. You got the freedom to watch him if you choose. He did a pretty good job on ACORN. What I am saying, he doesn’t represent the Republican Party. You can listen to him if you like. I choose not to because, quite frankly, I don’t — I don’t want to go down the road of thinking our best days are behind us. We need to act decisively.

People are genuinely upset with how much money we’re spending up here. But at the end of the day, when a person says he represents conservatism and that the country’s better off with Barack Obama than John McCain, that sort of ends the debate for me as to how much more I’m going to listen. So he has a right to say what he wants to say. In my view, it’s not the kind of political analysis that I buy into.

Watch it:

Transcript:

BAIER: Sen. Graham, quickly, this week you talked about base politics. You mentioned Glenn Beck, who is of course on the Fox News Channel and you said he does not appear to you to be aligned with any party but aligned with cynicism. There’s always a market for cynicism. Are you saying that Glenn Beck is bad for America?

GRAHAM: No, I’m not saying he’s bad for America. You got the freedom to watch him if you choose. He did a pretty good job on ACORN. What I am saying, he doesn’t represent the Republican Party. You can listen to him if you like. I choose not to because, quite frankly, I don’t — I don’t want to go down the road of thinking our best days are behind us. We need to act decisively.

People are genuinely upset with how much money we’re spending up here. But at the end of the day, when a person says he represents conservatism and that the country’s better off with Barack Obama than John McCain, that sort of ends the debate for me as to how much more I’m going to listen. So he has a right to say what he wants to say. In my view, it’s not the kind of political analysis that I buy into.

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