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Rep. Broun says clean energy legislation will cause southerners to die from hyperthermia.

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"Rep. Broun says clean energy legislation will cause southerners to die from hyperthermia."

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Late last week, Rep. Paul Broun (R-GA) went to the floor of the House to slam clean energy legislation. As part of his bizarre rant against a progressive energy bill, the congressman said that, as a result of the bill, people throughout the “southeast and southwest” who “depend on air condition just to live” will no longer be able to afford it. Broun went on to claim that these people will then go into hyperthermia, where their body temperatures skyrocket, and then “people are gonna die because of that”:

BROUN: A lot of old people in Georgia and Florida and all out through the southeast and southwest they’re depending upon air condition just to live. And if their electricity goes sky high, and the energy bill is gonna make that happen if it ever passes. And a lot of people aren’t gonna be able to afford to run their air condition anymore. And a lot of people are gonna have a hard time with, hyperthermia is what we call in medicine as a medical doctor, their body temperature is gonna go up. They’re gonna get dehydration and people are gonna have a lot of problems and it’s gonna have a greater impact on our health care system and people are gonna die because of that. And it’s gonna kill jobs too.

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This isn’t the first time Broun has claimed that congressional legislation is going to kill people. Last July, the congressman claimed that if Congress were to pass comprehensive health care reform, “a lot of people are going to die.” It is worth noting that, according to a 2007 study by Harvard University researchers, that global warming could lead to a significant rise in heat-related deaths. (HT: Media Matters)

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