GOP Rep Compares Defaulting On The Debt To The American Revolution

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"GOP Rep Compares Defaulting On The Debt To The American Revolution"

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Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-VA) offered a curious analogy this weekend, comparing the impending default to the American Revolution.

Griffith was asked about the fast-approaching debt ceiling, which if not raised, threatens to drag the U.S. economy back into a recession. He told The Hill on Saturday that he is not concerned with the economic consequences so long as he and his party get their way.

“We have to make a decision that’s right long-term for the United States, and what may be distasteful, unpleasant and not appropriate in the short run may be something that has to be done,” he said after a meeting of the House GOP, joining a long list of Republicans who have dismissed the consequences of blowing through the debt ceiling and causing a default on the nation’s payments,

But he offered a novel explanation for why he believes this kind of economic brinksmanship is necessary: because our founding fathers did it too:

“I will remind you that this group of renegades that decided that they wanted to break from the crown in 1776 did great damage to the economy of the colonies. They created the greatest nation and the best form of government, but they did damage to the economy in the short run.”

Griffith made no mention of the revolutionary war that proceeded the colonies’ act of economic vigilantism.

In recent days, some Republicans have backed away from plans to hold up a budget agreement unless Obamacare is defunded. The move came as business groups and conservative organizations like Heritage Action and the Koch Brothers acknowledged that default would bring about economic catastrophe.

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