Striking photos of Hurricane Ike — or what Hell and High Water will be like

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"Striking photos of Hurricane Ike — or what Hell and High Water will be like"

I have resized some pictures from Hurricane Ike — pictures that are likely to become all-too-common sights in the decades to come, assuming we continue our do-nothing climate policy. Larger versions of these photos are available here.

This is Galveston Island:

ike2.jpg

This is Galveston.

ike3.jpg

This is Haiti:

ike1.jpg

This is Gilchrest, Texas.

ike4.jpg

This is Winnie, Texas.

ike5.jpg

The time to act is yesterday.

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14 Responses to Striking photos of Hurricane Ike — or what Hell and High Water will be like

  1. paulm says:

    Looks like someones convinced the US gov to spend tax payers money on AGW.
    Maybe Bush has changed his mind for some reason….

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-09/dbnl-iot091808.php

    IMPACTS: On the threshold of abrupt climate change If an abrupt climate change caused the rapid breakup of the West Antarctic ice sheet, sea levels could rise by several meters within a century. Click here for more information.

    Abrupt climate change is a potential menace that hasn’t received much attention. That’s about to change. Through its Climate Change Prediction Program, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) recently launched IMPACTS � Investigation of the Magnitudes and Probabilities of Abrupt Climate Transitions � a program led by William Collins of Berkeley Lab’s Earth Sciences Division (ESD) that brings together six national laboratories to attack the problem of abrupt climate change, or ACC.

  2. just watching says:

    Sadly we humans are like the frog in a pan of water that is slowly getting hot. We will just sit hear and boil to death.

  3. gaiasdaughter says:

    I keep seeing Ike referred to as a ‘major hurricane.’ Technically, it was not. It was ‘only’ a cat 2. Imagine what stronger storms will do.

  4. john says:

    gaisdaughter:

    Ike was major because of it’s size. It was as large as Texas when it hit. The rating system that establishes a Hurricane’s “category” is based on its maximum wind speed, only but size and amount of moisture are at least as important in gauging a storm’s impact.

    Modeling forecasts indicate that all three will increase with GW. Of course, a category 5 the size of Ike is unthinkable in terms of the damage it would cause, so, yes, it could have been worse; but even at 2, Ike was no slouch.

  5. John Laumer says:

    Great post. How long will this take to fix with 700 big ones?

  6. llewelly says:

    I keep seeing Ike referred to as a ‘major hurricane.’ Technically, it was not. It was ‘only’ a cat 2. Imagine what stronger storms will do.

    Ike was category 4 when it passed to the north of Hati, and category 4 when it made landfall in Eastern Cuba. It was ‘only a cat 2′ when it affected the US Gulf coast. It is standard practice to classify hurricanes which are no longer active by their peak strength (they designated by their current strength only when still active). Likewise – Katrina is remembered as a category 5 hurricane, even though it was only cat 1 when it affected Florida, and had weakened to category 3 when it had made landfall in New Orleans. So Ike was a major hurricane, even though it was no longer at major hurricane strength when it affected Texas.

  7. David B. Benson says:

    Joe — Whadiyamean, ‘will be like”? IS!

  8. Bob Wallace says:

    Apparently there is a new rating system under development. One that incorporates both maximum wind speed and overall size.

    Possibly moisture content as well. Just don’t recall reading anything about that.

  9. Rick C says:

    This is also what Peak Oil looks like. This is what happened in Houston during the first week. I can’t tell you how many gas stations were closed or, where the stations were open, there were lines. There were reports of flared tempers at some filling stations. Some filling stations got batches of bad gas due to the emphasis on just getting gasoline without checking for water contamination. One of my coworkers got a dose of that bad gas and now her car engine rumbles intermittently regardless of speed.

    The grocery stores were bare of basic necessities. There was no meat on the shelves due to lack of power. There was some produce and almost no bread on the shelves. It reminded me of those old iron curtain countries where you had to queue up for every basic necessity.

    The only plus side was that I was able to clean up the debris on my lawn with a good old fashioned hand rake and a good new fashioned electric lawn mower I’ve been using with pride for the last 5 years. I knew one day that an electric mower would pay off.

  10. gaiasdaughter says:

    Bob Wallace, “Apparently there is a new rating system under development. One that incorporates both maximum wind speed and overall size.

    Possibly moisture content as well. Just don’t recall reading anything about that.”

    The new rating is called Integrated Kinetic Energy or, ironically, IKE for short. Jeff Master refers to it on his WunderBlog: “The way we can estimate this damage potential is to compute the total energy of Ike’s surface winds (kinetic energy). To do this, we must look at how strong the winds are, and factor in the areal coverage of these winds. Thus, we compute the Integrated Kinetic Energy (IKE) by squaring the velocity of the wind and summing over all regions of the hurricane with tropical storm force winds or higher. This “Integrated Kinetic Energy” was recently proposed by Dr. Mark Powell of NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division as a better measure of the destructive power of a hurricane’s storm surge than the usual Category 1-5 Saffir-Simpson scale.”

  11. Bob Wallace says:

    Yep. That’s where I read about it. Thanks.

    Looks like IKE doesn’t include a moisture rating. At least as reported here.

  12. Mike Cason says:

    I rode out hurricane Ike like a bullrider would in a rodeo. It was a wild ride. I’ve been through several of them, but not like Ike.

    Ike was not just a category 2 storm. It could and should have been classified differently due to its size and duration. Living in the Galveston Bay community, we had reports from local sources in the boating industry that wind speeds hit 135 mph. It was 12 hours of very intense winds from all directions.

    The intense wind speed and duration broke plywood and decking screws on the west windows of my two homes. We had a storm surge of a category 4 due to the length of time it had to shove water into the Galveston Bay and its bayous. An elderly gentleman who has lived next door since 1939 said the water has never reach this level, ever!

    This storm snapped trees and telephone poles like twigs.

    If a hurricane rated as a category 4 or 5 the size of Ike ever threatens our community, you will see this bullrider flipping burgers in Oregon.

  13. paulm says:

    This is Hell & High water…set to probably arrive at your door step soon…

    ‘We are going to disappear one day’
    This year four hurricanes hit Haiti, leaving 800 dead and a country drowning. Photographer Gideon Mendel waded waist-high through mud to bear witness to an ecological disaster that will only get worse

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/nov/08/haiti-hurricanes

    “The whole country is facing an ecological disaster,” said the prime minister, Michele Pierre-Louis. “We cannot keep going on like this. We are going to disappear one day. There will not be 400, 500 or 1,000 deaths. There are going to be a million deaths.”

  14. shop says:

    The intense wind speed and duration broke plywood and decking screws on the west windows of my two homes. We had a storm surge of a category 4 due to the length of time it had to shove water into the Galveston Bay and its bayous. An elderly gentleman who has lived next door since 1939 said the water has never reach this level, ever!