Energy and Global Warming News for March 26: Laser guidance adds power to wind turbines; Austin aims for grid makeover; Evangelicals embrace God and green

Posted on  

"Energy and Global Warming News for March 26: Laser guidance adds power to wind turbines; Austin aims for grid makeover; Evangelicals embrace God and green"

Vindicator NPPD InstallLaser Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines

The wind industry may soon be dependent on a different kind of environmental awareness that has more to do with lasers than ecology.

A new laser system that can be mounted on wind turbines allows them to prepare for the wind rushing toward their blades.

The lasers act like sonar for the wind, bouncing off microscopically small particulates and back to a fiber optic detector. That data is fed to an on-board processor that generates a three-dimensional view of the wind speed and direction. Subtle adjustments in the turbine blade’s angle to the window allows it to capture more energy and protect itself in case of strong gusts.

The startup company that developed the Vindicator system, Catch the Wind, recently deployed a wind unit on a Nebraska Public Power District turbine. It increased the production of the unit (.pdf) by more than 10 percent, according to the company’s white paper. If those numbers held across the nations’ 35 gigawatts of installed wind capacity, the LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) sensors could add more than 3.5 gigawatts of wind capacity without adding a single additional turbine.

“This is what they call disruptive technology,” said William Fetzer, vice president of business development for Catch the Wind. “There are roughly 80,000 to 90,000 wind turbines out in the world, and they don’t have this technology.”

Austin Aiming for a Grid Makeover

The city of Austin, Tex., today presented a wide-ranging list of recommendations for remaking its electricity system, including more energy efficiency measures and a change to the business model of the local utility.

The effort, known as the Pecan Street Project, goes beyond the concept of smart-grids and could serve as a national model, its backers say.

“We believe it is not enough for the grid to be smart. It needs to be smart and green,” said Jim Marston, who directs the Texas office of the Environmental Defense Fund and is a Pecan Street board member, in a conference call Wednesday.

Some other smart-grid projects, Mr. Marston added, are “are only looking for ways to lay off meter readers.”

The report’s recommendations range from expanding “demand response” programs to better management of water systems, which require huge amounts of electricity for pumping water.

But the key idea was rethinking the way Austin Energy, the electric utility, makes its money. Currently, the more electricity customers use, the more money the utility “” and the city of Austin, whose single largest source of revenue is the utility “” earns.

“This basic economic model is the single greatest obstacle standing between Austin Energy and a modernized energy delivery system,” the report stated.

This conundrum applies to most utilities around the country too. Roger Duncan, another Pecan Street board member who recently retired as the general manager of Austin Energy, said that he “didn’t really see any other utilities facing up to this problem.”

Pecan Street Project representatives say that some of the recommendations are already being implemented. Last year the Department of Energy awarded a $10.4 million grant to the group for a pilot smart-grid project in an Austin neighborhood.

GE unveils European wind energy future

General Electric announced Thursday it was investing roughly $453 million to expand wind energy facilities in four European countries.

Expansions plans for GE in Europe include the use of the company’s next-generation 4-megawatt turbine for offshore deployment. The new turbine features a drive train system that eliminates the need for a gear box and is the largest wind turbine in GE’s fleet.

Ferdinando Beccalli-Falco, president and chief executive of GE International, said the investments would help his company tap the huge wind energy potential in offshore Europe.

“Offshore wind will play a vital role in meeting the growing global demand for cleaner, renewable energy and has a bright future here in Europe,” he said.

GE points to studies that show that if all offshore wind farms planned for Europe are completed, the European Union could avoid more than 200 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year.

The projects could also meet up to 10 percent of the EU’s electricity needs, moving Europe closer to its goal of getting 20 percent of its energy from renewable resources by 2020.

The four projects in the United Kingdom, Norway, Sweden and Germany could enter operations as early as 2016.

Conservative Evangelicals embrace God and green

The cultural revolution of the 1960s and ’70s included the birth of the environmental movement. That’s when “there was a deep split, and the right stole God and the left stole green,” says Jonathan Merritt, a 20-something evangelical Christian who sees himself as a political conservative but also as an environmentalist. “I think God and green go together, and I think they belong together.”

While many Chris­t­ian denominations enthusiastically support efforts to combat climate change, evangelical Christians, who tend to be both theologically and politically conservative, have been caught up in an internal tussle over the issue in which skeptics seem to hold the upper hand.

But a new generation of Evangelicals such as Mr. Mer­ritt – who, he argues, carry less “baggage” from the 20th-century’s cultural wars – are making a spirited effort to show that their religious beliefs and their environmental concerns are not only compatible but inextricably linked.

“I’m an environmentalist because I’m a Christian and not in spite of that fact,” says Merritt, an author and speaker whose book, “Green Like God: Unlocking the Divine Plan for Our Planet,” will be published on Earth Day, April 21.

Conservative US Protes­tants are among those Chris­tians most likely to be skeptical that human-induced climate change is taking place. In a poll last year, only 34 percent of white Evangelicals agreed there is solid evidence that Earth is warming because of human activity. In contrast, 48 percent of white mainline Protestants agreed, according to the survey, released by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

White House hosts discussion on electric vehicles

The Detroit Free Press reports that the Obama administration will bring leading automakers together today to explore how the industry can best launch electric vehicles with the aid of utility companies.

Several people familiar with the event told the newspaper that auto industry task force chief Ron Bloom will oversee the meeting, which will include the Detroit automakers, several foreign companies including Honda Motor Co. and electric vehicle startups Fisker Automotive Inc. and Tesla Motors Inc.

Obama has been a strong supporter of electric vehicles. As a presidential candidate he campaigned on a pledge to push for 1 million plug-in hybrid vehicles on U.S. roads by 2015, and last year the White House announced $2.4 billion in grants to automakers and suppliers for electric vehicle efforts.

While electric utilities have generally backed automakers’ push toward battery-powered vehicles, both industries have lingering concerns about the availability of charging stations and how much energy demand such vehicles could create for the grid.

A group of electric wholesalers covering two-thirds of the United States and Canada released a study yesterday that stated that plug-in hybrids could boost electric demand by 10 percent in some areas only if all were charing during peak hours. If charging were staggered throughout the day, the study found minimal boosts in energy demand

Seoul Mayor Pins Political Hopes on Green Growth

On a recent morning, the mayor of Seoul stopped by a local amusement park to inaugurate a new electric tram system to ferry tourists around the grounds, replacing an old noisy one that belched exhaust. Music blared. A phalanx of TV crews trailed him.

For some politicians, the event might have been an obligatory photo opportunity, something to be endured en route to more important meetings. But for Oh Se-hoon, who has been striving to build a defining legacy for his mayoralty, it was a signature moment.

“We are the first in the world to use the technology this way,” he said, admiring the way the tram sucks electricity from power strips buried beneath the road. “What we are doing is changing history.”

Mr. Oh is among a new breed of South Korean politicians who increasingly stake their political fortunes on so-called green growth. For Mr. Oh, that means creating jobs based on environmentally friendly technologies and figuring out how to make this city, home to one-fifth of the country’s 49 million people, a healthier, more pleasant place to live.

Since taking office in 2006, Mr. Oh has striven to make the city look nicer and greener. Under his Design City slogan, the municipal authorities carted away urban eyesores like leaky shacks for shoe shiners and replaced them with artfully designed, government-subsidized kiosks. They revamped the old city center, turning part of its Kwanghwamoon Boulevard into a plaza where children can skate in winter.

“My goal in the changing of the face of Seoul is all related to enhancing its attractiveness,” said Mr. Oh, who is seeking re-election as his four-year term winds down. “If the city is attractive, people, information and capital flow in. This in turn creates economic re-vitality and it also creates a lot of jobs.”

Perhaps the issue Mr. Oh has pursued most successfully is air pollution.

While some of his competitors in the election may dismiss some of Mr. Oh’s initiatives as gimmicky, even they concede that the pink haze that used to envelop the metropolis has largely disappeared. The amount of pollutants in Seoul’s air has dropped 20 percent in the past four years, according to city data.

Brazil expands wind energy portfolio

Spanish renewable energy giant EDP Renewables broke ground on a third onshore wind farm in Brazil that has an installed capacity of 70 megawatts.

EDP Group subsidiary EDP Renewables began work on the 2,000-acre site in the state Rio Grande do Sul that would eventually meet the energy demands of 200,000 consumers.

Two wind farms in the region would combine with the Rio Grande do Sul project to deliver 84 MW of wind energy to Brazil.

An expanding Brazilian economy inspired the government to look for alternative energy resources, which would reduce the national dependence on foreign energy.

The Brazilian government awarded the wind farm license to EDP Renewables in January. The wind farm in the city of Tramandai comprises 31 wind turbines.

‘Green Fund’ for Climate Change Proposed by IMF Staff

A “Green Fund” designed to help nations meet climate-change pledges would sell bonds in global markets and use the proceeds to help poor countries deal with the effects of global warming, International Monetary Fund staff proposed in a report.

The report released today expands upon an idea mentioned by IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn earlier this month as a way to raise $100 billion a year by 2020.

The plan offers a mechanism for rich nations to honor their agreement from last year’s Copenhagen climate summit to provide that amount of money to developing countries to confront drought, flooding, food shortages and disease exacerbated by global warming.

Governments could inject reserve assets in the fund, including those disbursed by the IMF last year, it said. The IMF staff plan also calls for wealthy nations to provide separate subsidies to help finance grants, according to the report.

“Once created, the Green Fund could provide a unified resource mobilization framework capable of meeting the financing needs identified at Copenhagen for decades to come,” the IMF staff paper said. “This seems far preferable to the alternative — a succession of difficult international negotiations every few years, with uncertain outcomes.”

The climate fund is aimed at encouraging progress on negotiations towards a global agreement on curbing carbon emissions. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecasts as many as 250 million Africans may be exposed to water shortages by 2020 and some countries may see harvests fall by 50 percent.

« »

36 Responses to Energy and Global Warming News for March 26: Laser guidance adds power to wind turbines; Austin aims for grid makeover; Evangelicals embrace God and green

  1. C. Vink says:

    “Goddess” Himalaya Glacier Melting in War-Torn Kashmir>
    National Geographic, March 24 – The western Himalaya glacier known as the “goddess of light” provides water to millions. But the first research findings in decades reveal that climate change is taking its toll.

  2. prokaryote says:

    12th of march, 2010
    An Author’s Incredible Environmental Journey After a Coal Company Destroyed His Family’s Ancestral Home and Land
    After a strip-mining operation obliterated the author’s family homestead, he set out on a 10-year journey to examine the staggering human and environmental costs of coal.

    Biggers’ story is deeply rooted in cultural history. Mining companies have been destroying not just homes, forests and streams, but actual communities with stories, songs, heroes and legacies. Unfortunately, our love affair with coal continues, despite dire warnings from top scientists regarding global warming, the impact on human health from burning coal and desperate pleas from the people who live in areas of coal extraction.

    Sadly, the Obama administration has only been fanning the flames with talk about resources for so-called “clean coal,” a term that is nothing but industry smoke and mirrors. Biggers writes in his book about wanting to convey to the president what our addiction to coal really means:

    I wanted our president to know that the strip mines did not only obliterate our family homeplace and farm: they ripped out the roots of invaluable historic sites and stories, such as a secret black slave cemetery that had helped to give birth to the coal industry and churned them into unrecognizable bits of dust. History did not only vanish — it was covered up — the same way a native and lush Shawnee forest was wiped out and replaced, through a faux coal mining reclamation program, with foreign grasslands, and the aquatic life of Eagle Creek disappeared with the toxic runoff from the slurry pond.

    But dead fish don’t tell lies. Nor did our ruins. As Mexican writer Octavio Paz wrote in his Nobel laureate address, the ancient past in his country never truly disappeared; it remained a presence; it breathed its spirits into our contemporary decisions. It churned out bits of cautionary tales that reflected our choices and ways of living today.

    http://www.alternet.org/environment/146010/an_author%27s_incredible_environmental_journey_after_a_coal_company_destroyed_his_family%27s_ancestral_home_and_land

  3. Leif says:

    ~16 million without easy access to water and ~ 50 million affected by drought in SW China.
    http://www.enn.com/climate/article/41148
    That would be the equivalent of about 1/6 of the US population for those who are math impaired.

  4. Currently, the more electricity customers use, the more money the utility — and the city of Austin, whose single largest source of revenue is the utility — earns. This conundrum applies to most utilities around the country too. Roger Duncan, another Pecan Street board member who recently retired as the general manager of Austin Energy, said that he “didn’t really see any other utilities facing up to this problem.”

    This is nothing new. For decades, California utilities have had a rate structure that changes more per kwh to people who consume more electricity, plus economic incentives for utilities to invest in conservation rather than in new capacity.

  5. prokaryote says:

    Nature News content now freely available
    http://www.nature.com/press_releases/naturenews.html

  6. paulm says:

    electric cars are not a panacea for our comfortable private transport. Unless we tackle the back-end, electric generation its a worse scenario than what we have now.

    The problem is the switch over to electric cars is going to happen much faster than we can fix the back-end.

  7. prokaryote says:

    Climate Protesters Win Third Runway Battle
    UK, Friday March 26, 2010

    Protesters have won a High Court battle forcing the Government to consider climate change issues before plans for a third runway at Heathrow airport can go ahead.

    Firstly, these plans failed the climate change test, secondly they failed the economic test, thirdly there was not enough work put into organising how to get millions of additional passengers in and out of the airport.
    http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Business/Heathrow-Third-Runway-Climate-Change-Protesters-Win-Court-Battle-Forcing-Govt-To-Consider-Effects/Article/201003415583540?lpos=Business_First_Buisness_Article_Teaser_Region_3&lid=ARTICLE_15583540_Heathrow_Third_Runway%3A_Climate_Change_Protesters_Win_Court_Battle_Forcing_Govt_To_Consider_Effects

  8. max says:

    I’m curious if the tubercle technology for wind turbines is truly beneficial or so much hype (see the website for whale power) Also I wonder if Joe R has any comments re Pielke’s reviews of Gore and Hansen’s books in the March 18th edition of Nature.

  9. prokaryote says:

    Unsubscribe
    Poll
    What type of approach do you favor in dealing with America’s energy needs?:
    More nuclear
    More wind & solar
    Clean coal
    Natural gas
    Conservation only
    A mix of everything
    User login
    Log in using OpenID:
    What is OpenID?
    Username: *
    Password: *

    * Log in using OpenID
    * Cancel OpenID login

    * Create new account
    * Request new password

    Home
    Coming together for solutions
    Our focus is to work on bringing evangelicals together in support of solutions that meet our country’s energy needs and address our environmental challenges. Add your voice to ours today!
    Our Policy Statement
    We Believe…

    That it is our responsibility to care for God’s creation and that protecting the economic future of our children and grandchildren is a core family value.

    That America’s dependency on foreign oil harms our country’s national security.

    That the time is right for evangelicals to step forward and promote initiatives that will benefit our climate and foster American energy independence.
    http://www.greenevangelicals.org/

    Nice to have the church (evangelicals & catholics) and the science for the first time in human history on the same side!
    That is progress!

  10. prokaryote says:

    Oops, please delete the first lines …

  11. paulm says:

    Here’s a selection of prominent articles in my local Canadian paper business section….business as usual. Quite disconcerting.

    CEOs see oil as important energy source of the future
    Renewable power on the rise, but won’t replace fossil fuels
    http://www.vancouversun.com/business/technology/CEOs+important+energy+source+future/2722764/story.html

    Coal producers bullish on Asian demand
    A structural shift in the global market for steelmaking coal has British Columbiaproducers preparing for a major surge in production.
    http://www.vancouversun.com/Coal+producers+bullish+Asian+demand/2724219/story.html

    Oilsands lobbying moves EU to look at easing fuel standards
    A new discussion paper to be debated by a panel this week suggests that European officials will remove restrictions on fuel from the oilsands in its draft legislation, pending “further review.”
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Oilsands+lobbying+moves+look+easing+fuel+standards/2723713/story.html

  12. paulm says:

    We have to reduce by 110% by 2050 don’t we?

    Energy-efficient homes make householders complacent
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20527522.100-energyefficient-homes-make-householders-complacent.html

    The results of the studies – seven of them in total – suggest that such energy creep could wipe out as much as half of the anticipated savings from making homes more energy efficient (Building Research & Information, vol 38, issue 1).

    Lomas says the results question whether the government’s target of reducing energy consumption in homes to 20 per cent of 1990 levels by 2050 is achievable.

  13. Doug says:

    “It increased the production of the unit by more than 10 percent… If those numbers held across the nations’ 35 gigawatts of installed wind capacity, the … sensors could add more than 3.5 gigawatts of wind capacity”

    I like this. You can add the equivalent of 2 nuclear power plants — or 20 by the time any new nuke plants can come online, assuming another 10x increase in wind capacity by then — just by adding some more intelligence into the wind-generation system.

    This is yet another example of how smart efficiency improvements beat the old brute-force methods, hands-down.

  14. Leif says:

    I just looked at Whale Power site. They are calming a gain of as much as 40%! efficiency on wind turbine blades. If in fact that hold true??? WOW!

  15. paulm says:

    Electric cars jostle for position on the power grid
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20527515.700-electric-cars-jostle-for-position-on-the-power-grid.html

    “The electricity industry has to keep the lights on,” says Joe DiNucci, a director of Coulomb Technologies in San Jose, California, which makes electric vehicle charging points. “They need to know what charging points are doing, and to have some control.”

  16. David B. Benson says:

    MoMA has a show on potential futures for NYC according to today’s TNYT.

  17. Dan B says:

    It’s terrifying that the IMF is thinking “Green”. Will money rule? Or will access to truly BIG money rule?

    And there’s GE.

    On the positive side there’s Google – Do no evil. Would that the former two corporate interests embraced that simple rule.

    Dan

    P.S. A Network of conversations is embracing and progressive. A corporation, as licensed in the USA is charged with being a leech unless it’s clearly and profoundly stated in it’s charter and organizing principles. What have we allowed ourselves to become?

  18. fj2 says:

    re: “Laser Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines”

    Blue sky stuff (perhaps)

    Considering that the fastest vehicles for many years were ice boats clocked at 144 miles per hour back in 1914 it should be possible to use ultra light rails automatically adjusted to wind directions to carry small single-person vehicles going impressive speeds at a very small environmental footprints.

  19. Bob Wallace says:

    fj2 – You’ve never sailed, I take it?

    Sometimes the wind comes from the direction in which you want to travel and you are forced to “tack” back and forth in an inefficient manner to gain forward progress.

    Can you imagine how one would adjust rails so that they align themselves ~50% off the direction of the wind and in a zig-zag pattern? And readjust themselves on very short notice as the wind “clocks”?

    Better to use turbines which can efficiently swivel to face the wind to create electricity and then ship that power to vehicles. Then you can violate the rule that “Gentlemen don’t beat into the wind”.

  20. fj2 says:

    20. Bob Wallace, “Can you imagine how one would adjust rails so that they align themselves ~50% off the direction of the wind and in a zig-zag pattern? And readjust themselves on very short notice as the wind “clocks”?”

    yes!

  21. Beautiful pictures of Earth Hour: yesterday evening global action to switch off the lights for one hour, demanding better climate policies: http://bit.ly/EHpics

  22. Bob Wallace says:

    fj2 -

    Well, lay it out. Show us a plan that would allow one to ‘go to the wind’ with the wind switching over a 100+ degree range, often in abrupt changes.

    Love to see how you both create a system that can rapidly shift hundreds/thousands of miles of track and how real estate you’d need.

  23. Bob Wallace says:

    Oh, and don’t forget to include some method of storing up power for when the wind quits blowing.

    You thinking some really big rubber bands?

  24. fj2 says:

    23. Bob Wallace, “Love to see how you both create a system that can rapidly shift hundreds/thousands of miles of track and how real estate you’d need.”

    So would I!

    First disclaimer as mentioned: This is a concept, i.e., “Blue sky stuff (perhaps)” and is more of a fun idea than something I would personally spend a lot of time on. Small vehicle hybrid human-electric transit is a lot more practical for here and now with environmental footprints likely less than 1 percent that of automobiles.

    Second disclaimer: It would probably require commercialized advanced molecular strength material science such as carbon nanotubes 100 to 200 times stronger than steel per weight projected for availability by mid-century.

    Other stuff (making this up on the fly)

    One strategy:
    Ultra light rails would automatically align themselves into the wind so this may be a viable start; adjustable support systems and articulation would have to be worked out. Of course, the sail(s) will stall as soon as the vehicle reaches wind speed.

    Perhaps some sort of rudder system would automatically align the rails off the wind say, at about 120 degrees. It should be noted that these vehicles could move really fast making their own wind — especially with permanent magnetic levitation (halbach arrays or attractive permanent magnetic systems like MagneMotion) — and move the apparent wind far forward to about 45 degrees. Minor adjustments to the sail(s) on the vehicle should also help.

    Magnetic induction as the vehicles race along could produce energy for storage through the rail. Linear induction motoring (LIM) could provide power when the wind dies i.e., hybrid wind-electric.

    Might be perfect for going across large expanses like the Great Plains though tacking in smaller areas might be feasible especially with banking, etc., etc., . . .

    Not really sure how big rubber bands would help.

  25. Bob Wallace says:

    Your fantasy is pretty complicated.

    Perhaps you should switch to soap box racers.

    Now all you have to do is to figure out how to make every destination downhill from where one starts….

  26. fj2 says:

    26. Bob Wallace, “Perhaps you should switch to soap box racers.”

    Ok, I’ll get back to you.

  27. Gadik says:

    If this device can develop here in our country then this will become a a big help for us all. Hope our government will act with this… :)

  28. Love says:

    @Gadik – I am from Philippines and right now we are experiencing black out every now and then… hope this will be introduce to us…

  29. Insiders says:

    he more electricity customers use, the more money the utility — and the city of Austin, whose single largest source of revenue is the utility — earns. This conundrum applies to most utilities around the country too.

  30. Cainlove says:

    @insiders- you are right about what you’ve said…

  31. hungry says:

    I like this idea “Ultra light rails would automatically align themselves into the wind so this may be a viable start; adjustable support systems and articulation would have to be worked out. Of course, the sail(s) will stall as soon as the vehicle reaches wind speed.”

  32. sailrick says:

    The reason ice boats can go that fast is twofold. One, they have very little friction, almost no resistance to moving. Two, its the apparant wind, not the true wind making this possible. The faster the ice boat goes the more apparant wind, which makes it accelerate more, and so on.
    Also why Oracle’s new 90 foot America’s Cup catamaran can do over 50 knots, riding on a hydrofoil.

  33. sailrick says:

    off topic

    hungry
    When sailing, on most points of sail you are not being pushed by the wind. The sail is an airfoil, just like a wing. Lift is created on the forward side of the sail. Its possible to sail much faster than the wind, but only with extreme boats like the two I mentioned. Both also carry a lot of sail for their size, with the Oracle catamaran having an ungodly amount of sail area and a really tall mast. I think I read it was 18 stories high, which would make it about twice as long as the boat, while normally a mast is maybe 15-25% longer than the boat. A 5,000 sq ft mainsail and 7,000 sq ft in their largest headsail.

  34. Leland Palmer says:

    A “Green Fund” designed to help nations meet climate-change pledges would sell bonds in global markets and use the proceeds to help poor countries deal with the effects of global warming, International Monetary Fund staff proposed in a report.

    The report released today expands upon an idea mentioned by IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn earlier this month as a way to raise $100 billion a year by 2020.

    The plan offers a mechanism for rich nations to honor their agreement from last year’s Copenhagen climate summit to provide that amount of money to developing countries to confront drought, flooding, food shortages and disease exacerbated by global warming.

    Don’t like this emphasis on adaptation, rather than technological change in the energy sectors.

    Only after we spend five or ten times as much on prevention, should we spend one hundred billion dollars on adaptation.

    Is it cynical of me to wonder what role huge politically connected engineering corporations like Bechtel had in this decision, to spend lots of money on adaptation? Globally, it seems likely that they would get a big share of the heavy construction adaptation money.

  35. Bob Wallace says:

    “BrightSource Energy, developer of large-scale solar thermal plants, has contracted engineering giant Bechtel to build its Ivanpah Solar Energy Generating System in California — a complex of three solar plants expected to produce 440 megawatts (enough to power about 330,000 homes). Bechtel will also be investing equity in the project — giving BrightSource some of the support it needs to fulfill other contracts amounting to 2.6 gigawatts worth of energy.”

    http://green.venturebeat.com/2009/09/09/brightsource-gets-some-backup-from-bechtel-for-26-gw-of-solar/

    There’s money to be made by major corporations from renewables. Look at GE with their wind turbines and thin film solar.