One Easy Way Anyone With A Mailbox Can Occupy Wall Street

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"One Easy Way Anyone With A Mailbox Can Occupy Wall Street"

It's time to send the credit card industry a message, literally.

Thousands of people across the nation continue to occupy public parks, bank lobbies, city squares, and other locations to speak out against economic injustice and corporate influence in our democracy. Yet particularly as temperatures drop and the weather turns harsh, many Americans will be looking for a way to support the 99 Percent Movement other than physically occupying a public space and attending mass protests.

Artie Moffa, a San Fransisco poet and SAT tutor, has devised an easy way almost any American can help keep Wall Street occupied.

In a video uploaded to YouTube, Moffa points out that just about anybody with a postal address gets junk mail from credit card companies. He says that these credit card offers “aren’t junk mail,” but an “opportunity for a dialogue.” Moffa notes that every one of these credit card offers contains a business reply mail envelope, and that the banks pay postage only on the envelopes that are mailed back. So he suggests that Americans take these envelopes and simply send them back empty — costing the financial institutions that send them 25 cents a piece in postage.

Moffa then suggests that you don’t even have to send the envelope back empty. You can send it back with a note protesting the big banks’ policies. Or you can load the envelope up with something like a wood shim, which would cause it to weigh more and thus increase its postal costs. Moffa suggests that ultimately this tactic wouldn’t just be about costing the companies money — it’s about sending a message. And he goes on to conclude that it’s “no substitute for getting out into the street and making your voices heard.” But it’s an easy way anyone “can keep Wall Street occupied.” Watch Moffa present his plan on YouTube:

As of this writing, Moffa’s video already has 175,456 views on YouTube, and it’s only been up four days.

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