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GA Judge Mocks Bailed-Out Bank In Foreclosure Case, Says It’s Time To ‘Stand Up’ For Taxpayers

By Zaid Jilani  

"GA Judge Mocks Bailed-Out Bank In Foreclosure Case, Says It’s Time To ‘Stand Up’ For Taxpayers"

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Judge Blackmon has no tolerance for bailed-out banks.

Starting with the occupation of Wall Street on Sept. 17, the 99 Percent have started to find their voice, speaking against income inequality, the policies of big banks, and other social injustices that have left the top 1 percent fabulously wealthy at the expense of most Americans.

Judge Dennis Blackmon of the Superior Court of Carroll County, Georgia, stood proudly for the 99 Percent earlier this month when he released an opinion siding against U.S. Bank and for homeowner Otis Phillips in a foreclosure case where Phillips was suing the bank for violating its agreements.

He started his opinion by saying that sometimes only the courts can protect taxpayers, and that sometimes “is now” and the place is the “Great State of Georgia.” The judge then went on to point out that U.S. Bank received 20 billion dollars of taxpayer cash as a part of the financial bailouts and participated in the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) while offering no meaningful help for the homeowner in this case.

Blackmon blasted U.S. Bank for failing to approve a HAMP modification for Phillips, saying that if he did not qualify for the modifications that the bank could’ve shown this with actual documentation, which they failed to do. The judge jokes that maybe the bank ran out of the 20 billion dollars of taxpayer funds it received so it didn’t have the ink to do so. Read Blackmon’s full opinion denying U.S. Bank:

Us Bank Opinion

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