Where Do Rich Lowry and Ramesh Ponnuru Get Their Policy Models From

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"Where Do Rich Lowry and Ramesh Ponnuru Get Their Policy Models From"

The particulars of mass transit aside, another thing that annoyed me about the previously mentioned Lowry & Ponnuru paragraph about how liberals hate America was their effort to establish some kind of presumption against looking at other countries for models of good policy ideas: “The Left’s search for a foreign template to graft onto America grew more desperate. Why couldn’t we be more like them — like the French, like the Swedes, like the Danes? Like any people with a larger and busier government overawing the private sector and civil society?”

Bike sharing in Barcelona -- a good idea from abroad that Washington, DC has emulated (my cc photo)

Bike sharing in Barcelona -- a good idea from abroad that Washington, DC has emulated (my cc photo)

In this telling, there’s something insidious about asking if they don’t do something better someplace else. But of course another way of looking at it is that you by definition can’t find examples of alternatives to the US status quo by looking at the US. That’s why you regularly see the Cato Institute touting Chile’s pension system or Heritage extolling the virtues of Sweden’s K-12 education or David Frum talking up French nuclear power. After all, we’ve never attempted to shift from a guaranteed pay-as-you-go pension system to a mandatory savings one in the United States. Nor do we have any examples of widespread operation of public elementary schools by for-profit firms. Nor do we have a robust nuclear power sector. So if you want to explore these ideas—ideas that conservatives often do want to explore—you need to look at models from abroad.

And there’s nothing wrong with that! So why isn’t it okay for liberals to talk about French health care or Finnish education or Danish energy policy? As Barack Obama once said, when you look at the right sometimes it’s like they’re proud of being ignorant.

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