Right-wing group sends 12-year-old girl to interview Roy Moore

"[We wanted] to show that there was a wide range of people who support Roy Moore."

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, in Fairhope, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, in Fairhope, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A pro-Trump group arranged this week to have a 12-year-old girl interview Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, whose special election campaign is entering its final 24 hours.

Millie March went viral at the Conservative Party Action Conference (CPAC) in February, where she offered a full-throttle defense of President Trump’s legislative agenda. Since then, she has become a darling of the right-wing, being interviewed by Fox and Friends in July and meeting Trump himself in September.

As a result, the America First Project — a pro-Trump group founded by former Breitbart writers — decided that Millie would be the best person to interview Moore, who has been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women, several of whom say he approached them when they were teenagers.

“We thought it was important to not only come here…to support Roy Moore but also to bring Millie here,” America First Project Vice President Jennifer Lawrence said in a televised preamble. “[We wanted] to show that there was a wide range of people who support Roy Moore.”

In the interview, posted to the America First Project’s YouTube page on Sunday, Moore speaks with Millie about building a wall along the southern U.S. border, as well as the myriad issues he believes are plaguing the country.

“I think we need something and I think [illegal immigration] can be stopped sooner then that with the military. I think the military can be used down with Border Patrol and actually stop immigration,” Moore explains to Millie at one point. “If we need to stop it permanently we build the wall and I think it would be an inexpensive way to do [so].”

Moore adds that the most important issues facing Alabamans include religious liberty, healthcare, taxes and military readiness. He mentions that he’d like to do away with income tax, and thinks that U.S. industry is hampered by over-regulation.

Unsurprisingly, Moore’s sexual harassment allegations do not come up.

Moore continues to face opposition on all sides as the Alabama special election slowly reaches its conclusion, with several polls suggesting the race is effectively a toss-up.

On Sunday, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) told CNN that he’d voted early and wrote in a Republican candidate other than Roy Moore on his ballot, saying “the state of Alabama deserves better.” On Monday, Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) and Nebraska Republican National Committeewoman Joyce Simmons both condemned Moore as well, Hurd echoing Shelby’s call, saying that Alabamans “deserve better”, and Simmons criticizing the RNC’s decision to fund Moore’s campaign. Simmons submitted her resignation to chair Ronna McDaniel on Friday.

Meanwhile, audio of Roy Moore claiming that eliminating the constitutional amendments after the 10th Amendment would “eliminate many problems” emerged on Monday. Amendments after the 10th include the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery; the 15th Amendment, which prevented voter discrimination; and the 19th Amendment, which extended voting rights to women. Moore also previously co-authored a textbook which teaches students that women shouldn’t run for office. Moore has denied that he holds these views, pointing out that he did not write the chapter in question.