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Atlantic Cities

The awesome new Atlantic Cities site is launching today, edited by Richard Florida and my friend Sommer Mathis. I should be contributing content pretty regularly, and have a piece up for launch on the link between education reform and housing policy which, in my view, goes much deeper than cliché points about funding. A more high-profile feature is offered by Ryan Avent who cannily pitched a piece about urbanism and the Texas jobs record before I did.

At any rate, read Sommer’s introduction here. I also really liked this feature from Nate Berg about how to define a city’s boundaries. Los Angeles makes a great example of why municipal boundaries are usually irrelevant if you’re interested in social or economic analysis:

Common sense is that Santa Monica is a neighborhood of the same city that borders it on three sides, but the law says otherwise. Something I think we don’t know enough about is the impact of different forms of boundary drawing on an urban area’s fate. On the one hand, concentrating formal political power at a low level could improve responsiveness and encourage competition to provide quality services. On the other hand, some of the gaps in Los Angeles look an awful lot like affluent communities not wanting to pay for the LAPD and other services that are objectively more-needed in the city proper.

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