Department of Homeland Security and State Department suspend Trump’s Muslim ban

It’s unclear how many visas were already canceled, however.

Supporters cheer as an Iranian citizen with a valid U.S. visa arrives at Los Angeles International Airport, Feb. 2, 2017. CREDIT: AP/Damian Dovarganes
Supporters cheer as an Iranian citizen with a valid U.S. visa arrives at Los Angeles International Airport, Feb. 2, 2017. CREDIT: AP/Damian Dovarganes

On Saturday, the State Department reversed its revocation of up to 60,000 visas from people who come from seven Muslim-majority countries, the Associated Press reported. Homeland Security also said it would not direct airlines to keep visa-holders from boarding planes to the U.S. and that it would suspend “any and all actions” related to the executive order.

However, it is unclear how many people will still lack visas because some of them were physically canceled, CNN reported.

On Friday, a federal judge halted President Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, which means for now, people holding valid visas from those countries are free to board planes to the United States.

Earlier on Friday, the State Department said 60,000 visas were provisionally revoked as a result of Trump’s executive order last week.

Judge James Robart granted the order to block enforcement as the result of a lawsuit from the states of Washington and Minnesota, which argued the ban was unconstitutional. Robart, who was appointed by George W. Bush, has not yet made a final decision on the ban.

Trump tweeted in response to the “so-called” judge’s decision, saying if “certain people” are allowed into the country, it’s “death and destruction.” Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in a statement that the Department of Justice “intends to file an emergency stay of the order and defend the executive order of the President, which we believe is lawful and appropriate.”

The week following the ban has been one of chaos and confusion. Last Saturday, an earlier lawsuit led to a federal judge giving a temporary restraining order preventing people from Muslim majority countries from being deported. Protesters showed up at several major airports across the country to oppose the ban and continue to do so.

Last weekend, some airports continued to detain people and refused to let attorneys see them. ThinkProgress reported scenes from Dulles International Airport where Customs and Border Protection officials refused to comply with the court order and blocked immigration lawyers from entering the customs area. When Acting Attorney General Sally Yates refused to enforce the ban, calling it unlawful, the president fired her.