Federal judge halts implementation of Trump’s Muslim ban at airports

The temporary restraining order applies nationally

Protesters assemble at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 after earlier in the day two Iraqi refugees were detained while trying to enter the country. On Friday, Jan. 27, President Donald Trump signed an executive order suspending all immigration from countries with terrorism concerns for 90 days. Countries included in the ban are Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, which are all Muslim-majority nations. CREDIT: AP Photo/Craig Ruttle
Protesters assemble at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 after earlier in the day two Iraqi refugees were detained while trying to enter the country. On Friday, Jan. 27, President Donald Trump signed an executive order suspending all immigration from countries with terrorism concerns for 90 days. Countries included in the ban are Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, which are all Muslim-majority nations. CREDIT: AP Photo/Craig Ruttle

A federal judge has sided with the ACLU, preventing individuals from majority Muslim countries who arrive at U.S. airports from being deported as a result of Donald Trump’s executive order.

Trump’s order banned all citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the country. The suit was filed by the ACLU on behalf of several individuals from banned countries detained at U.S. airports after Trump issued the order Friday night.

The temporary restraining order will prevent citizens of these countries currently being held at U.S. airports from being deported. The ACLU said the order would impact about “100 to 200 people detained at U.S. airports or in transit.”

Judge Ann Donnelly did not make a final ruling on the constitutionality of the executive order. Further proceedings will be held that month.

The judge’s decision was captured by Jackie Vimo, a Policy Analyst for the National Immigration Law Center:

ACLU lawyer Lee Gelernt explains the impact of the order. At a minimum, no one currently here with a valid visa will be sent back, Gelernt contends. They will continue challenging the order more broadly and seek to get individuals out of detention.

https://twitter.com/ACLU/status/825532347839836161/video/1

The ruling also did not explicitly release individuals being detained at airports. But the judge seemed to indicate she expects them to be released.

“If someone is not being released, I guess I’ll just hear from you,” the judge said.

Here is the full text of the order, which restrains Donald Trump from “further acts and misconduct in violation of the Constitution”:

This is the key part of the order:

ENJOINED AND RESTRAINED from, in any manner or by any means, removing individuals with refugee application approved by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services as part of the U.S. Refugee Admission Program, holders of valid immigrant and non-immigrant visas and other individuals from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen legally authorized to enter the United States.

Protesters in San Francisco react to news of the stay:

This is breaking news. The piece will be updated as more information becomes available.