Advertisement

First-time voter casts his ballot against Trump in Trump-friendly South Philly

“This is an election between good and evil. Trump is evil.”

Daniel, outside his polling place on Reed Street in Philadelphia, which is normally a working garage, proudly displays an “I voted” sticker for the first time. CREDIT: Ryan Koronowski
Daniel, outside his polling place on Reed Street in Philadelphia, which is normally a working garage, proudly displays an “I voted” sticker for the first time. CREDIT: Ryan Koronowski

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA —“This is the first time in my life that I’ve voted, and I’m voting for Hillary to stop the monster,” Daniel told ThinkProgress. He cited past problems with addresses, registration, and getting an ID as reasons he had never voted before today. But he said this election was too important for him to sit out. He felt compelled to vote for Hillary Clinton.

He wouldn’t give his last name, standing outside the Chobert Decorators garage, his polling location in the Passyunk, a working class neighborhood of Philadelphia. He says he has lived in this area, a bastion of Trump support, for “a while.” Several neighbors, hearing about his vote, congratulated him for his civic act.

“I couldn’t take it no more,” Daniel said. “He’s the most horrible monster that’s ever run for president of the United States.”

When reminded there are a fair number of Trump signs in the neighborhood, Daniel paused. “Yeah, well there’s a lot of monsters around here that think — or a lot of people that think — he’s going to do good and then when they find out he’s just a cheater, a liar, and a thief and has no heart for anybody but his own diabolical ambitions…” Daniel trailed off and looked pained.

Advertisement

“All his promises are worthless because he’s only know how to steal, cheat, lie, insult, his whole life,” Daniel said.

Nationally, Trump has led Clinton with non-college educated white male voters by a 59-point margin.

Daniel talked through his fears about Trump: He labeled the candidate a “woman molester” and feared Trump would start a nuclear war. He would create a recession with the Trump campaign’s tax plan benefitting “the billionaires,” said Daniel, and he would steal the oil in Iraq, and “charge other countries for protection.”

“I know I only got a couple years left to live, but what about the next generation?” Daniel asked. “He’s a threat to the whole world, not just to this country.”

Daniel looking in at the Chobert Decorators Garage in Philadelphia’s Ward 1 which doubles as a polling place on Election Day. CREDIT: Ryan Koronowski
Daniel looking in at the Chobert Decorators Garage in Philadelphia’s Ward 1 which doubles as a polling place on Election Day. CREDIT: Ryan Koronowski

“I’m not saying this country never did any bad things before but he wants to stop Muslims from coming into the country. He’s against the constitution. He wants to make this a dictatorship.”

Advertisement

“He only cares about what he can steal, and what he can accumulate himself,” Daniel said. “Like hire construction companies and not pay them.”

Asked if he had been following the U.S. Senate race in Pennsylvania, where Democrat Katie McGinty has waged a close fight against incumbent Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA), Daniel said he had voted straight-ticket Democrat, because of Trump.

“The only good thing Trump has ever did in his life was destroy the Republican party, and it was accidental, it wasn’t on purpose.”

“Lot of false things said about Hillary, lot of false things. I believe she’s a good lady, trying to help this country. Trump is just seeing what he can rob and steal, and what he could destroy. ‘Oh I love war! Why can’t we use nuclear weapons?’ Three times in the first security meeting, or something?”

As a first time voter, Daniel had not fully grasped that voting in a garage is not a typical American voting experience. Asked what he thought about voting in a garage, he said “I like this, because there’s no long lines.”

“I wish she would devastate him completely,” he concluded. “His name is not as good as it used to be.”

Polls opened in the Keystone State at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m.