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Global Warming Pollution Is Killing Colombian Coffee

Coffee production in Colombia and Latin America is plummeting because of rising temperatures and extreme precipitation related to carbon pollution, the New York Times reports. “Coffee production is under threat from global warming, and the outlook for Arabica in particular is not good,” Peter Baker, a coffee specialist, told the Times. “Average temperatures in Colombia’s coffee growing regions have risen nearly one degree in the last 30 years, and in some mountain areas the increase has been double that,” according to Cenicafé, the national coffee research center:

Purveyors fear that the Arabica coffee supply from Colombia may never rebound — that the world might, in effect, hit “peak coffee.” In 2006, Colombia produced more than 12 million of 132-pound bags of coffee, and set a goal of 17 million for 2014. Last year the yield was nine million bags.

The threat of fossil-fueled weather to Colombia is not simply to coffee production, of course — record floods in the past year have left 311 people dead and over two million people affected.

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