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McCain Wraps Up Poverty Tour With Speech At ‘Business Awards’ Banquet

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) is currently on his “Forgotten America” tour, talking about the need to address the places “ignored for long years by the sins of indifference and injustice.” The Washington Post writes, “In effect, McCain is launching Version 2.0 of Bush’s ‘compassionate conservative’ campaign.”

Today, McCain is speaking in Katrina-ravaged New Orleans. But tonight, he will travel to upstate Louisiana to Baton Rouge and return to the wealthiest Americans as the “guest speaker” at the 25th annual Business Awards and Hall Of Fame banquet. BusinessReport.com reports:

Arizona Sen. John McCain, the Republican presidential front-runner, is the guest speaker for the 25th annual Business Awards and Hall of Fame Banquet presented by Business Report and Junior Achievement. The event, sponsored by Capital One and Franklin Press, is scheduled for Thursday, April 24 at the Holiday Inn Select on Constitution Avenue.

While proceeds benefit the Junior Achievement Endowment Fund, it’s likely that only the wealthiest can attend, as “tickets are $75 per person, $550 for a table of eight and $700 for a table of 10.”

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It’s fitting that McCain would end a tour of the poorest parts of the country by talking to wealthy Americans. After all, he is offering a $1.7 trillion dollar tax cut for corporations, despite U.S. corporate taxes being the fourth-lowest in the industrialized world as a share of the economy.

Throughout this week, he has touted tax relief for the poor. But adults working full time earning minimum wage and living in poverty would not even receive a tax cut from McCain, as a Center for American Progress Action Fund analysis reveals:

As McCain polishes his “image” this week, he is unlikely to mention how his proposed spending cuts will also neuter key anti-poverty programs.

Robert Gordon of the Center for American Progress observes today, “It’s admirable that John McCain is visiting ‘forgotten places,’ but his economic plan forgot about the people who live there.”