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Mother Of Murdered Infant: ‘If They Truly Want To Honor Me’ They Won’t Execute The Killer

CREDIT: AP
CREDIT: AP

The mother of an 11-month old baby who was raped and killed by an Oklahoma death-row inmate is adamant about not wanting the prisoner killed. The prisoner in question, Charles Warner, is one of four men appealing their death sentences over the drugs used to execute death-row inmates.

In 1997, Shonda Waller entered the home she shared with Warner and found her 11-month-old daughter, Adrianna Waller, unconscious. Shortly thereafter, the baby was pronounced dead, having suffered from “a crushing injury to the head and brain damage, a broken jaw, three fractured ribs, a lacerated liver, a bruised spleen and lungs, [and] eye hemorrhages.”

But despite the egregious acts committed against her daughter, Waller is opposed to the state executing Warner for his crimes.

“If they truly want to honor me, then they will do away with the death penalty for him, and they will give him life in prison without the possiblity of parole,” Waller said in a video that was sent to the defendant’s lawyers.”When he dies, I want it to be because it’s his time, not because he’s been executed due to what happened to me and my child. I don’t want that on my hands. It makes me feel like I’m no different from him.”

Watch Waller’s full video:

LIVE – NBCNews offsiteEdit descriptionplayer.theplatform.comMeanwhile, Warner is one of four inmates — including Benjamin Robert, Richard Eugene Glossip, and John Marion Grant — challenging their death sentence in light of the botched execution of Clayton Lockett last year. A ruling by the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit previously approved the drugs used to execute inmates, but the group has appealed to the Supreme Court to challenge the ruling. Their lawyers argue that one of the drugs used, midazolam, does not actually put people in “a deep, comalike unconsciousness” to eliminate pain.

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After Lockett gasped for 43 minutes during his lethal injection, opponents of the death penalty were outraged by the use of midazolam and other drugs they considered highly experimental. An autopsy report later found that the executioners actually punctured Lockett’s skin with the IV used to pump a three-drug cocktail, which resulted in the drugs’ absorption by the prisoner’s muscles. However, the botched execution raised ethics concerns about the use of drugs produced by “compounding pharmacies” that are not overseen by the Food and Drug Administration. The effects of lethal doses of midazolam are also unknown, and anesthesiologists claim that the drug is generally administered after surgery — not as an anesthetic before a procedure.

If the Supreme Court does not intervene, Warner’s execution is scheduled to take place today.