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New Yorkers Cut Trans Fat Consumption Under Fast Food Regulations

A new report confirms that New York City’s ban on trans fat in restaurant food did help decrease city residents’ consumption of the artery-clogging substance, as opposed to concerns that consumers would simply replace trans fat with a different kind of fatty substance. New York City’s artificial trans fat restriction was the first of its kind, forcing restaurants to alter recipes so that their food contained no more than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene surveyed customers about their lunchtime purchases at fast-food chains around the city in 2007 and 2009 — before and after the ban was in place — and found that the amount of trans fat in each lunch sold dropped an average of 2.4 grams after the ban went into effect. Hamburger chains saw the biggest drop in trans fat. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (I) also passed an unprecedented ban on large soda sizes earlier this year.

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