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No Charges For Two Officers Who Backed False Version Of University Of Cincinnati Shooting

Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing appears at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose. CREDIT: AP PHOTO/JOHN MINCHILLO
Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing appears at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose. CREDIT: AP PHOTO/JOHN MINCHILLO

Earlier this week, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said he was so outraged over the police shooting of Samuel DuBose that he would personally prosecute University of Cincinnati officer Ray Tensing, whom he vowed to treat as “a murderer.” But on Friday, Deters announced that neither he nor the grand jury would be bringing charges for the two officers present at the scene, who backed up Tensing’s false version of events.

Tensing claimed that he had gotten stuck in the car and was being dragged when he fired his weapon. Fellow officers Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt agreed that was what happened.

Were it not for body camera footage that showed Tensing suddenly shooting DuBose in the head with no provocation, the officers’ account of what happened would almost certainly have gone unchallenged. In the three officers’ body camera footage, Tensing can be heard claiming immediately after the shooting that he had almost been run over. The two other officers agree, telling him they saw that happen.

This also isn’t the first time at least one of these officers has been involved in the death of an unarmed black man. Kidd, along with six other officers, restrained and tased a schizophrenic man, Kelly Brinson, in a hospital psychiatric ward in 2010. Brinson died and his family sued, ultimately settling with the police department and the hospital for $638,000. University of Cincinnati campus police officers were also removed from the psychiatric wards at the hospital, according to the Guardian.

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Kidd and Lindenschmidt are on paid leave as a result of internal investigation. Tensing, meanwhile, has bonded out of jail and is looking to get his job back.