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October 10 News: U.S. Drought Brings Corn And Soy Supplies Below Previous Year’s Consumption For First Time In 38 Years

Drought damage to corn and soybean fields in the U.S., the world’s top grower and exporter, is eroding supplies of the nation’s two largest crops to below year-earlier consumption levels for the first time since 1974. [Businessweek]

U.S. milk production is headed for the biggest contraction in 12 years as a drought-fueled surge in feed costs drives more cows to slaughter. [Businessweek]

Global clean energy investment looks to be heading for a dip this year following a weak performance over the third quarter of 2012. A total of $56.6bn was invested from July to September, a five per cent drop on the previous quarter and 20 per cent lower than the same period last year, figures from analyst Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) revealed today. [Guardian]

NOAA’s latest State of the Climate roundup shows that September marked the 16th month in a row with above-average temperatures for the lower 48 states of the U.S. [Climate Central]

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A large and growing majority of Americans say “global warming is affecting weather in the United States” (74%, up 5 points since our last national survey in March 2012). [Yale]

The number of natural disasters per year has been rising dramatically on all continents since 1980, but the trend is steepest for North America where countries have been battered by hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, searing heat and drought, a new report says. [USA Today]

An Alaskan village that claims global warming is eroding its shoreline is asking for a rehearing of their case against several power companies it says are to blame. [Legal Newsline]

A published study by researchers at the West Virginia University School of Medicine and School of Public Health is the first of its kind to suggest that exposure to air pollution particles from mountaintop mining sites may impair blood vessels’ ability to dilate, which may lead to cardiovascular disease. [The State Journal]

Thousands of people have avoided getting skin cancer thanks to Canadian scientists who invented the UV index and the gold-standard tool for measuring the thickness of the Earth’s ozone layer. But now Canada’s ozone science group no longer exists, victim of government budget cuts. [Guardian]

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Chevron on Tuesday lost a U.S. Supreme Court bid to block an $18.2 billion judgment against it in Ecuador in a case over pollution in the Amazon jungle. [Mercury News]

Australia switched on its first utility-scale solar farm on Wednesday, bringing the country a small step closer to achieving ambitious renewable energy use targets that traditional coal and gas power producers are now fighting to soften. [Reuters]